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Race and Insurance Status as Risk Factors for Trauma Mortality

Race and Insurance Status as Risk Factors for Trauma Mortality ORIGINAL ARTICLE Race and Insurance Status as Risk Factors for Trauma Mortality Adil H. Haider, MD, MPH; David C. Chang, MPH, MBA, PhD; David T. Efron, MD; Elliott R. Haut, MD; Marie Crandall, MD, MPH; Edward E. Cornwell III, MD Objective: To determine the effect of race and insur- adjusted odds ratio (OR) of death compared with white ance status on trauma mortality. patients (African American OR,1.17; 95% confidence in- terval [CI], 1.10-1.23; Hispanic OR,1.47; 95% CI, 1.39- Methods: Review of patients (aged 18-64 years; Injury 1.57). Insured patients (47%) had lower crude mortal- Severity Score9) included in the National Trauma Data ity rates than uninsured patients (4.4% vs 8.6%; P=.05). Bank (2001-2005). African American and Hispanic pa- Insured African American and Hispanic patients had in- tients were each compared with white patients and in- creased mortality rates compared with insured white pa- sured patients were compared with uninsured patients. tients. This effect worsened for uninsured patients across Multiple logistic regression analyses determined differ- groups (insured African American OR,1.2; 95% CI, 1.08- ences in survival rates after adjusting for demographics, 1.33; insured Hispanic OR,1.51; 95% CI, 1.36-1.64; un- injury severity (Injury Severity Score and revised Trauma insured white OR,1.55; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Surgery American Medical Association

Race and Insurance Status as Risk Factors for Trauma Mortality

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2008 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6254
eISSN
2168-6262
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.143.10.945
pmid
18936372
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Race and Insurance Status as Risk Factors for Trauma Mortality Adil H. Haider, MD, MPH; David C. Chang, MPH, MBA, PhD; David T. Efron, MD; Elliott R. Haut, MD; Marie Crandall, MD, MPH; Edward E. Cornwell III, MD Objective: To determine the effect of race and insur- adjusted odds ratio (OR) of death compared with white ance status on trauma mortality. patients (African American OR,1.17; 95% confidence in- terval [CI], 1.10-1.23; Hispanic OR,1.47; 95% CI, 1.39- Methods: Review of patients (aged 18-64 years; Injury 1.57). Insured patients (47%) had lower crude mortal- Severity Score9) included in the National Trauma Data ity rates than uninsured patients (4.4% vs 8.6%; P=.05). Bank (2001-2005). African American and Hispanic pa- Insured African American and Hispanic patients had in- tients were each compared with white patients and in- creased mortality rates compared with insured white pa- sured patients were compared with uninsured patients. tients. This effect worsened for uninsured patients across Multiple logistic regression analyses determined differ- groups (insured African American OR,1.2; 95% CI, 1.08- ences in survival rates after adjusting for demographics, 1.33; insured Hispanic OR,1.51; 95% CI, 1.36-1.64; un- injury severity (Injury Severity Score and revised Trauma insured white OR,1.55;

Journal

JAMA SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 2008

References