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QUANTITATIVE WASSERMANN TESTS IN DIAGNOSIS OF CONGENITAL SYPHILIS

QUANTITATIVE WASSERMANN TESTS IN DIAGNOSIS OF CONGENITAL SYPHILIS The problem of deciding whether the infant of a syphilitic mother is also syphilitic and requires specific treatment is frequently difficult, particularly when the mother had been treated during her pregnancy and the baby shows no clinical manifestations of the disease but does have a positive serologic reaction in the blood from the cord or in the peripheral blood during the neonatal period. Fildes1 in 1915, after studying 1,015 infants in a clinic in East London with special attenion to the question of syphilis, concluded: "The Wassermann reaction obtained with blood from the placental end of the cord is not diagnostic of syphilis in the infant but of syphilis in the mother." He further stated: "The phenomenon does not depend on the use of blood from the umbilical cord but is also met with when the blood is obtained direct from the infant." Fildes' observation that initially positive Wassermann http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

QUANTITATIVE WASSERMANN TESTS IN DIAGNOSIS OF CONGENITAL SYPHILIS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1936 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1936.01970180003001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The problem of deciding whether the infant of a syphilitic mother is also syphilitic and requires specific treatment is frequently difficult, particularly when the mother had been treated during her pregnancy and the baby shows no clinical manifestations of the disease but does have a positive serologic reaction in the blood from the cord or in the peripheral blood during the neonatal period. Fildes1 in 1915, after studying 1,015 infants in a clinic in East London with special attenion to the question of syphilis, concluded: "The Wassermann reaction obtained with blood from the placental end of the cord is not diagnostic of syphilis in the infant but of syphilis in the mother." He further stated: "The phenomenon does not depend on the use of blood from the umbilical cord but is also met with when the blood is obtained direct from the infant." Fildes' observation that initially positive Wassermann

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1936

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