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QUANTITATIVE VARIATIONS IN THE RESPIRATION OF THE NEWBORN INFANT

QUANTITATIVE VARIATIONS IN THE RESPIRATION OF THE NEWBORN INFANT ADDITIONAL observations have been made on the respiration of 14 sleeping newborn infants ranging in age from 8 days to 46 days, in an effort to reexamine the trend and range of normal with reference to minute volume, tidal air, rate, and pattern. The observations have been related to the weight of the infant, and in some instances to the body surface. It is hoped that a contribution toward a better understanding of the normal trend and range of the respiration of the newborn infant during sleep will be obtained from this material so that a proper interpretation may be made when a stimulating gas is administered. Certain records have been analyzed by 10-second periods within the total minute to show that the volume of air breathed is at all times an astatic or changing quantity. Although we confirmed the statement of Cross1 and Boutourline-Young2 that the average http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

QUANTITATIVE VARIATIONS IN THE RESPIRATION OF THE NEWBORN INFANT

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1953 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1953.02050080294004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ADDITIONAL observations have been made on the respiration of 14 sleeping newborn infants ranging in age from 8 days to 46 days, in an effort to reexamine the trend and range of normal with reference to minute volume, tidal air, rate, and pattern. The observations have been related to the weight of the infant, and in some instances to the body surface. It is hoped that a contribution toward a better understanding of the normal trend and range of the respiration of the newborn infant during sleep will be obtained from this material so that a proper interpretation may be made when a stimulating gas is administered. Certain records have been analyzed by 10-second periods within the total minute to show that the volume of air breathed is at all times an astatic or changing quantity. Although we confirmed the statement of Cross1 and Boutourline-Young2 that the average

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1953

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