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Quality of Medical Information on the Internet

Quality of Medical Information on the Internet To the Editor. —The Editorial1 on the quality of medical information on the Internet raises many valid points. As someone who has both reflex sympathetic dystrophy and systemic lupus erythematosus, I am concerned about the quality of information that I gather about my illnesses. I also run a Web site and listserv mailing list for people with reflex sympathetic dystrophy, so I have a vested interest in how information is presented on the Internet. Clearly, medical pages on the Internet are a mixed bag. Some sites are excellent and others are just plain scary; nonetheless all are equally accessible online. The problem, however, is not only with the quality of information on the Internet, but with the quality of information that many patients receive from their physicians. While many clinicians do an excellent job of providing information to their chronically ill patients, many of them do not. Until physicians take the time http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Quality of Medical Information on the Internet

JAMA , Volume 278 (8) – Aug 27, 1997

Quality of Medical Information on the Internet

Abstract



To the Editor.
—The Editorial1 on the quality of medical information on the Internet raises many valid points. As someone who has both reflex sympathetic dystrophy and systemic lupus erythematosus, I am concerned about the quality of information that I gather about my illnesses. I also run a Web site and listserv mailing list for people with reflex sympathetic dystrophy, so I have a vested interest in how information is presented on the Internet. Clearly,...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1997.03550080042025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor. —The Editorial1 on the quality of medical information on the Internet raises many valid points. As someone who has both reflex sympathetic dystrophy and systemic lupus erythematosus, I am concerned about the quality of information that I gather about my illnesses. I also run a Web site and listserv mailing list for people with reflex sympathetic dystrophy, so I have a vested interest in how information is presented on the Internet. Clearly, medical pages on the Internet are a mixed bag. Some sites are excellent and others are just plain scary; nonetheless all are equally accessible online. The problem, however, is not only with the quality of information on the Internet, but with the quality of information that many patients receive from their physicians. While many clinicians do an excellent job of providing information to their chronically ill patients, many of them do not. Until physicians take the time

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 27, 1997

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