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Q-Switched Ruby Laser Treatment of Congenital Nevi

Q-Switched Ruby Laser Treatment of Congenital Nevi Abstract The Q-switched ruby laser has been used to treat a number of cutaneous lesions, including lentigines,1 tattoos, and nevus of Ota.2 The Q-switched ruby laser emits visible red light with a wave-length of 694 nm and pulse duration of 28 to 40 nanoseconds. This relatively long wavelength and short pulse duration allow for the absorption of laser energy into the dermis with minimal textural changes. Laser energy is selectively absorbed by both keratinocytes and melanocytes containing melanosomes. Although melanin in these melanosomes has an absorption spectrum that is highest in the UV range, diminishing toward the infrared range, there is minimal competitive absorption of ruby energy (694 nm) by oxyhemoglobin.3 Management of congenital nevi has been the subject of much debate over the past decade. This stems from the unresolved controversy concerning their potential for malignant degeneration, specifically to malignant melanoma. We report on the use References 1. Goldberg DJ. Dermatologic cosmetic laser surgery . Am J Cosmetic Surg. 1992; 9:281-288. 2. Goldberg DJ, Nychay SG. Q-switched ruby laser treatment of nevus of Ota . J Dermatol Surg Oncol. 1992;18:817-821.Crossref 3. Anderson RR, Parrish JA. The optics of human skin . J Invest Dermatol. 1981; 77:13-19.Crossref 4. Sober AJ, Mihm MC, Fitzpatrick TB, Clark WH. Malignant melanoma of the skin and benign neoplasms and hyperplasia of melanocytes in the skin . In: Fitzpatrick TB, Eisen AZ, Wolff, K, Freedberg IM, Austen KF, eds. Dermatology in General Medicine . New York, NY: McGraw-Hill International Book Co; 1979:629-654. 5. Alper J, Holmes LB, Mihm MC. Birthmarks with serious medical significance: nevocellular nevi, sebaceous nevi, and multiple café-au-lait spots . J Pediatr. 1979;95:696-700.Crossref 6. Rhodes AR, Wood WC, Sober AJ, Mihm MC. Nonepidermal origin of malignant melanoma associated with giant congenital nevocellular nevus . Plast Reconstr Surg. 1981;67:782-790.Crossref 7. Johnson HA. Permanent removal of pigmentation from giant hairy nevi by dermabrasion in early age . Br J Plast Surg. 1977;30:321-323.Crossref 8. Gallico GG, O'Connor NE, Compton CC, Remensnyder JP, Kehinde O, Green H. Cultured epithelial autografts for giant congenital nevi . Plast Reconstr Surg. 1989;84:1-9.Crossref 9. Jacobson M, Baker DC. Extensive giant congenital melanocytic nevus of the face and scalp: problems of diagnosis and management . Am J Dermatopathol. 1985;7( (supp) ):177-181.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Q-Switched Ruby Laser Treatment of Congenital Nevi

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 131 (5) – May 1, 1995

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1995.01690170125030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The Q-switched ruby laser has been used to treat a number of cutaneous lesions, including lentigines,1 tattoos, and nevus of Ota.2 The Q-switched ruby laser emits visible red light with a wave-length of 694 nm and pulse duration of 28 to 40 nanoseconds. This relatively long wavelength and short pulse duration allow for the absorption of laser energy into the dermis with minimal textural changes. Laser energy is selectively absorbed by both keratinocytes and melanocytes containing melanosomes. Although melanin in these melanosomes has an absorption spectrum that is highest in the UV range, diminishing toward the infrared range, there is minimal competitive absorption of ruby energy (694 nm) by oxyhemoglobin.3 Management of congenital nevi has been the subject of much debate over the past decade. This stems from the unresolved controversy concerning their potential for malignant degeneration, specifically to malignant melanoma. We report on the use References 1. Goldberg DJ. Dermatologic cosmetic laser surgery . Am J Cosmetic Surg. 1992; 9:281-288. 2. Goldberg DJ, Nychay SG. Q-switched ruby laser treatment of nevus of Ota . J Dermatol Surg Oncol. 1992;18:817-821.Crossref 3. Anderson RR, Parrish JA. The optics of human skin . J Invest Dermatol. 1981; 77:13-19.Crossref 4. Sober AJ, Mihm MC, Fitzpatrick TB, Clark WH. Malignant melanoma of the skin and benign neoplasms and hyperplasia of melanocytes in the skin . In: Fitzpatrick TB, Eisen AZ, Wolff, K, Freedberg IM, Austen KF, eds. Dermatology in General Medicine . New York, NY: McGraw-Hill International Book Co; 1979:629-654. 5. Alper J, Holmes LB, Mihm MC. Birthmarks with serious medical significance: nevocellular nevi, sebaceous nevi, and multiple café-au-lait spots . J Pediatr. 1979;95:696-700.Crossref 6. Rhodes AR, Wood WC, Sober AJ, Mihm MC. Nonepidermal origin of malignant melanoma associated with giant congenital nevocellular nevus . Plast Reconstr Surg. 1981;67:782-790.Crossref 7. Johnson HA. Permanent removal of pigmentation from giant hairy nevi by dermabrasion in early age . Br J Plast Surg. 1977;30:321-323.Crossref 8. Gallico GG, O'Connor NE, Compton CC, Remensnyder JP, Kehinde O, Green H. Cultured epithelial autografts for giant congenital nevi . Plast Reconstr Surg. 1989;84:1-9.Crossref 9. Jacobson M, Baker DC. Extensive giant congenital melanocytic nevus of the face and scalp: problems of diagnosis and management . Am J Dermatopathol. 1985;7( (supp) ):177-181.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1995

References