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PULMONARY CONSUMPTION:—ITS DIETETIC AND REGEMINAL MANAGEMENT.

PULMONARY CONSUMPTION:—ITS DIETETIC AND REGEMINAL MANAGEMENT. Pulmonary consumption, the greatest enemy of mankind, is not an incurable disease. However, if fhe unfortunate subject of this disease is to be given an opportunity to escape the fate of the majority he must be surrounded by favorable conditions and must submit to certain necessary rules and regulations. I deem it an essential preliminary to success that there should be a happy combination of interests and hopes between patient and physician. The patient should be candidly informed of the nature of his malady; of its varied and tedious course; of its leading symptoms and complications; of its dangerous character; of the possibility of a cure and of the necessity of his exercising to the utmost his powers of patience, hope and confidence. On the other hand the physician must have a wide, varied and exact knowledge of medicine in general and of phthisis in particular; he must know and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

PULMONARY CONSUMPTION:—ITS DIETETIC AND REGEMINAL MANAGEMENT.

JAMA , Volume XIX (4) – Jul 23, 1892

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1892 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1892.02420040021001g
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Pulmonary consumption, the greatest enemy of mankind, is not an incurable disease. However, if fhe unfortunate subject of this disease is to be given an opportunity to escape the fate of the majority he must be surrounded by favorable conditions and must submit to certain necessary rules and regulations. I deem it an essential preliminary to success that there should be a happy combination of interests and hopes between patient and physician. The patient should be candidly informed of the nature of his malady; of its varied and tedious course; of its leading symptoms and complications; of its dangerous character; of the possibility of a cure and of the necessity of his exercising to the utmost his powers of patience, hope and confidence. On the other hand the physician must have a wide, varied and exact knowledge of medicine in general and of phthisis in particular; he must know and

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 23, 1892

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