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PUERPERAL INFECTION.

PUERPERAL INFECTION. As this does not pretend to be an exhaustive treatise on puerperal fever, so-called, I will make no apology for slighting certain parts of the subject; and if I seem to wander too near the boundary line of the undiscovered, it will not be for the sake of the theorizing, but with the desire to draw, from reasonable inferences, certain conclusions that may assist in our every-day work. In regard to a choice of name for the puerperal condition now under consideration, there is not entire unanimity among medical men. Garrigues objects to the term puerperal fever, principally on the ground of its expressing only a symptom and in exceptional cases not even that, as he states there is sometimes no fever at all. Metria, he thinks too vague, and septicemia too strong a term for mild cases; therefore, he prefers the term "puerperal infection" and while admitting that it http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

PUERPERAL INFECTION.

JAMA , Volume XXIX (25) – Dec 18, 1897

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1897 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1897.02440510019001f
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

As this does not pretend to be an exhaustive treatise on puerperal fever, so-called, I will make no apology for slighting certain parts of the subject; and if I seem to wander too near the boundary line of the undiscovered, it will not be for the sake of the theorizing, but with the desire to draw, from reasonable inferences, certain conclusions that may assist in our every-day work. In regard to a choice of name for the puerperal condition now under consideration, there is not entire unanimity among medical men. Garrigues objects to the term puerperal fever, principally on the ground of its expressing only a symptom and in exceptional cases not even that, as he states there is sometimes no fever at all. Metria, he thinks too vague, and septicemia too strong a term for mild cases; therefore, he prefers the term "puerperal infection" and while admitting that it

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 18, 1897

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