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Publication Bias

Publication Bias EDITORIAL The Problem and Some Suggestions N THIS issue of the ARCHIVES, Klassen et al con- achieved for patients with acute lymphoblastic leuke- 3 4 tribute an interesting article on the problem of mia and osteogenic sarcoma. These advances may be publication bias. They examined abstracts pre- partly attributable to the multicenter nature of pediatric sented at Society for Pediatric Research meet- cancer trials. I ings from 1992 through 1995 and found that The need for large studies has spawned a number only 59% of randomized controlled trials presented at the of pediatric networks to study other diseases. The Ver- meetings were subsequently published. Abstracts were mont Oxford Network was created to support the more likely to be published as a full study if, using some implementation of large studies in neonatal intensive criteria for statistical significance, they either reported care units. The Pediatric Research in Office Settings that the outcomes of the treated group were superior to network of the American Academy of Pediatrics has those of the control group or reported that a newer therapy grown into a consortium of more than 1400 physicians was at least equivalent to an older treatment. To re- in 470 practices http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2002 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.156.5.424
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EDITORIAL The Problem and Some Suggestions N THIS issue of the ARCHIVES, Klassen et al con- achieved for patients with acute lymphoblastic leuke- 3 4 tribute an interesting article on the problem of mia and osteogenic sarcoma. These advances may be publication bias. They examined abstracts pre- partly attributable to the multicenter nature of pediatric sented at Society for Pediatric Research meet- cancer trials. I ings from 1992 through 1995 and found that The need for large studies has spawned a number only 59% of randomized controlled trials presented at the of pediatric networks to study other diseases. The Ver- meetings were subsequently published. Abstracts were mont Oxford Network was created to support the more likely to be published as a full study if, using some implementation of large studies in neonatal intensive criteria for statistical significance, they either reported care units. The Pediatric Research in Office Settings that the outcomes of the treated group were superior to network of the American Academy of Pediatrics has those of the control group or reported that a newer therapy grown into a consortium of more than 1400 physicians was at least equivalent to an older treatment. To re- in 470 practices

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 2002

References