Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Psychiatry as Part of a Mixed Internship: A Report Based on Five Years of Experience

Psychiatry as Part of a Mixed Internship: A Report Based on Five Years of Experience Abstract The traditional rotating internship has given ground more and more in recent years to straight and mixed internships. In none of the one year mixed internships, however, did psychiatry participate as a full partner until 1960 when a mixed psychiatry-medicine (or pediatric) internship was introduced at the Upstate Medical Center of the State University of New York. The rationale for including psychiatry in this manner has been set forth in a previous article1 and, therefore, will not be presented here. It need only be pointed out that the same changes in medical education and patterns of practice which made it feasible and desirable to develop straight and mixed internships generally also made it feasible and desirable to develop a mixed psychiatry-medicine internship. Programs of the type introduced at the Upstate Medical Center were specifically approved by the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals of the American References 1. Similarly, in our experience, first year residents in internal medicine are less willing to work on a psychiatric service than third year residents. Since the latter have acquired a basic knowledge of their own field, they find it easier to turn to a related field than the former who are still intent on learning the fundamentals of internal medicine, particularly the management of life-threatening diseases. 2. Hollender, M. H.: Psychiatry as Part of a Mixed Internship , JAMA 175:489, 1961.Crossref 3. Directory of Approved Internships and Residencies, Essentials of an Approved Internship , Chicago: American Medical Association, 1960. 4. JAMA 174:663, 1960. 5. American Psychiatric Association: Training the Psychiatrist to Meet Changing Needs, Washington, DC: the Association, 1963. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of General Psychiatry American Medical Association

Psychiatry as Part of a Mixed Internship: A Report Based on Five Years of Experience

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/psychiatry-as-part-of-a-mixed-internship-a-report-based-on-five-years-a7BBzn0gIx
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1965 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-990X
eISSN
1598-3636
DOI
10.1001/archpsyc.1965.01720310020003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The traditional rotating internship has given ground more and more in recent years to straight and mixed internships. In none of the one year mixed internships, however, did psychiatry participate as a full partner until 1960 when a mixed psychiatry-medicine (or pediatric) internship was introduced at the Upstate Medical Center of the State University of New York. The rationale for including psychiatry in this manner has been set forth in a previous article1 and, therefore, will not be presented here. It need only be pointed out that the same changes in medical education and patterns of practice which made it feasible and desirable to develop straight and mixed internships generally also made it feasible and desirable to develop a mixed psychiatry-medicine internship. Programs of the type introduced at the Upstate Medical Center were specifically approved by the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals of the American References 1. Similarly, in our experience, first year residents in internal medicine are less willing to work on a psychiatric service than third year residents. Since the latter have acquired a basic knowledge of their own field, they find it easier to turn to a related field than the former who are still intent on learning the fundamentals of internal medicine, particularly the management of life-threatening diseases. 2. Hollender, M. H.: Psychiatry as Part of a Mixed Internship , JAMA 175:489, 1961.Crossref 3. Directory of Approved Internships and Residencies, Essentials of an Approved Internship , Chicago: American Medical Association, 1960. 4. JAMA 174:663, 1960. 5. American Psychiatric Association: Training the Psychiatrist to Meet Changing Needs, Washington, DC: the Association, 1963.

Journal

Archives of General PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1965

References