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PSEUDOMEMBRANOUS ENTEROCOLITIS AND MASTOIDITIS ASSOCIATED WITH INFECTION WITH MORGAN'S BACILLUS

PSEUDOMEMBRANOUS ENTEROCOLITIS AND MASTOIDITIS ASSOCIATED WITH INFECTION WITH MORGAN'S BACILLUS In his original work on summer diarrhea in London, Morgan1 described a bacillus isolated from the intestinal contents in twenty-eight of fifty-eight cases, which was gram-negative, motile, a producer of acid and slight gas in dextrose, levulose and galactose broths, not reacting with the other sugars, and forming indol in peptone beef broth. The bacillus was demonstrated to be pathogenic when fed to rats and rabbits. Bacilli giving the same cultural reactions have since been reported by several others as associated with or causing enteritis. The agglutination reactions2 have proved to be of little if any value in their identification, presumably due to the occurrence of different strains. The conclusion of Dick, Dick and Williams,3 that the epidemic of enteritis associated with mastoiditis which they observed in infants was primarily an intestinal infection due to Morgan's dysentery bacillus, has prompted the report of the following case: REPORT http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

PSEUDOMEMBRANOUS ENTEROCOLITIS AND MASTOIDITIS ASSOCIATED WITH INFECTION WITH MORGAN'S BACILLUS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1929 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1929.01930040123008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In his original work on summer diarrhea in London, Morgan1 described a bacillus isolated from the intestinal contents in twenty-eight of fifty-eight cases, which was gram-negative, motile, a producer of acid and slight gas in dextrose, levulose and galactose broths, not reacting with the other sugars, and forming indol in peptone beef broth. The bacillus was demonstrated to be pathogenic when fed to rats and rabbits. Bacilli giving the same cultural reactions have since been reported by several others as associated with or causing enteritis. The agglutination reactions2 have proved to be of little if any value in their identification, presumably due to the occurrence of different strains. The conclusion of Dick, Dick and Williams,3 that the epidemic of enteritis associated with mastoiditis which they observed in infants was primarily an intestinal infection due to Morgan's dysentery bacillus, has prompted the report of the following case: REPORT

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1929

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