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PROTEIN DEFICIENCIES IN PREGNANCY

PROTEIN DEFICIENCIES IN PREGNANCY The term protein deficiency, the definition of which is obvious, is to be preferred to the more commonly used term hypoproteinemia for at least two reasons. In the first place the term hypoproteinemia makes no provision for the degrees of protein depletion, which are of importance even when they are not sufficiently pronounced to lower the circulating proteins to the level of hypoproteinemia. In the second place hypoproteinemia, from the standpoint of etymology, concerns only the circulating protein of the blood, which is now believed to be less important in the body economy than the protein depots in the tissues, and the reparation of which is fully as important as the reparation of the circulating protein. The Food and Nutrition Board of the National Research Council recommends a daily allowance of at least 85 Gm. of protein during the latter half of pregnancy and regards two thirds of the optimum http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

PROTEIN DEFICIENCIES IN PREGNANCY

JAMA , Volume 127 (17) – Apr 28, 1945

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1945 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1945.02860170013003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The term protein deficiency, the definition of which is obvious, is to be preferred to the more commonly used term hypoproteinemia for at least two reasons. In the first place the term hypoproteinemia makes no provision for the degrees of protein depletion, which are of importance even when they are not sufficiently pronounced to lower the circulating proteins to the level of hypoproteinemia. In the second place hypoproteinemia, from the standpoint of etymology, concerns only the circulating protein of the blood, which is now believed to be less important in the body economy than the protein depots in the tissues, and the reparation of which is fully as important as the reparation of the circulating protein. The Food and Nutrition Board of the National Research Council recommends a daily allowance of at least 85 Gm. of protein during the latter half of pregnancy and regards two thirds of the optimum

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 28, 1945

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