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Protein C and Fibrinolysis

Protein C and Fibrinolysis Abstract To the Editor.— The interesting association of protein C and protein S deficiency to lipodermatosclerosis and venous ulceration was reviewed in the September 1990 issue of the Archives.1 In discussing the function of protein C the authors appropriately state that protein C inactivates coagulation factors V and VIII in their activated form. In their conclusion, they comment that "An increased propensity for deep venous thrombosis, as could occur in the setting of protein C or protein S deficiency and perhaps in combination with a faulty fibrinolytic system, may lead to the development of venous occlusion and venous hypertension."Besides its function in preventing fibrin formation via inhibition of coagulation factors Va and VIIIa,2 activated protein C also serves a profibrinolytic function. Among the many proteins essential for normal fibrinolytic function are the plasminogen activator inhibitors, which prevent the formation of plasmin necessary for fibrinolysis.3 Plasminogen activator inhibitor References 1. Falanga V, Bontempo FA, Eaglestein WH. Protein C and protein S plasma levels in patients with lipodermatosclerosis and venous ulceration . Arch Dermatol. 1990;126:1195-1197.Crossref 2. Clouse LH, Comp PC. The regulation of hemostasis: the protein C system . N Engl J Med. 1986;314:1298-1304.Crossref 3. Sprengers ED, Kluft C. Plasminogen activator inhibitors . Blood. 1987;69:381-387. 4. Moake JL. Hypercoagulable states . Adv Intern Med. 1990;35:235-248. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Protein C and Fibrinolysis

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 127 (6) – Jun 1, 1991

Protein C and Fibrinolysis

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— The interesting association of protein C and protein S deficiency to lipodermatosclerosis and venous ulceration was reviewed in the September 1990 issue of the Archives.1 In discussing the function of protein C the authors appropriately state that protein C inactivates coagulation factors V and VIII in their activated form. In their conclusion, they comment that "An increased propensity for deep venous thrombosis, as could occur in the setting of protein C...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1991.01680050155024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— The interesting association of protein C and protein S deficiency to lipodermatosclerosis and venous ulceration was reviewed in the September 1990 issue of the Archives.1 In discussing the function of protein C the authors appropriately state that protein C inactivates coagulation factors V and VIII in their activated form. In their conclusion, they comment that "An increased propensity for deep venous thrombosis, as could occur in the setting of protein C or protein S deficiency and perhaps in combination with a faulty fibrinolytic system, may lead to the development of venous occlusion and venous hypertension."Besides its function in preventing fibrin formation via inhibition of coagulation factors Va and VIIIa,2 activated protein C also serves a profibrinolytic function. Among the many proteins essential for normal fibrinolytic function are the plasminogen activator inhibitors, which prevent the formation of plasmin necessary for fibrinolysis.3 Plasminogen activator inhibitor References 1. Falanga V, Bontempo FA, Eaglestein WH. Protein C and protein S plasma levels in patients with lipodermatosclerosis and venous ulceration . Arch Dermatol. 1990;126:1195-1197.Crossref 2. Clouse LH, Comp PC. The regulation of hemostasis: the protein C system . N Engl J Med. 1986;314:1298-1304.Crossref 3. Sprengers ED, Kluft C. Plasminogen activator inhibitors . Blood. 1987;69:381-387. 4. Moake JL. Hypercoagulable states . Adv Intern Med. 1990;35:235-248.

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1991

References