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Prolonged Survival With Palliative Care—It Is Possible, but Is It Necessary?

Prolonged Survival With Palliative Care—It Is Possible, but Is It Necessary? Opinion EDITORIAL Ryan Nipp, MD; Areej El-Jawahri, MD; Jennifer Temel, MD Palliative care is defined as care provided by a specially trained survival. In addition, continuity of care for patients seen in team of clinicians that is both patient and family centered and the inpatient setting is often lacking, as inpatient palliative care seeks to enhance quality of life throughout the continuum of does not represent a longitudinal care model. Third, this study 1,2 illness. Multiple studies have reported benefits associated with reported an association between palliative care and survival. Pa- integrating early palliative care tients who received palliative care within a month after diagno- with standard oncology care sis experienced poor survival outcomes. Notably, these pa- Related article page 1702 for patients with advanced tients were likely quite ill, with a high symptom burden, which cancer to address patients’ symptoms, understanding of their prompted the consultation, as most of the palliative care con- 3-7 disease, coping strategies, and medical decision-making. Con- sultations occurred in the inpatient setting. Moreover, patients sequently, guidelines recommend early integration of pallia- who received palliative care in the 31 to 365 days after their di- tive care for patients with advanced cancer, concurrently with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Oncology American Medical Association

Prolonged Survival With Palliative Care—It Is Possible, but Is It Necessary?

JAMA Oncology , Volume 5 (12) – Dec 19, 2019

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2019 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2374-2437
eISSN
2374-2445
DOI
10.1001/jamaoncol.2019.3100
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL Ryan Nipp, MD; Areej El-Jawahri, MD; Jennifer Temel, MD Palliative care is defined as care provided by a specially trained survival. In addition, continuity of care for patients seen in team of clinicians that is both patient and family centered and the inpatient setting is often lacking, as inpatient palliative care seeks to enhance quality of life throughout the continuum of does not represent a longitudinal care model. Third, this study 1,2 illness. Multiple studies have reported benefits associated with reported an association between palliative care and survival. Pa- integrating early palliative care tients who received palliative care within a month after diagno- with standard oncology care sis experienced poor survival outcomes. Notably, these pa- Related article page 1702 for patients with advanced tients were likely quite ill, with a high symptom burden, which cancer to address patients’ symptoms, understanding of their prompted the consultation, as most of the palliative care con- 3-7 disease, coping strategies, and medical decision-making. Con- sultations occurred in the inpatient setting. Moreover, patients sequently, guidelines recommend early integration of pallia- who received palliative care in the 31 to 365 days after their di- tive care for patients with advanced cancer, concurrently with

Journal

JAMA OncologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 19, 2019

References