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PROGNOSIS IN SO-CALLED SCIATIC NEURITIS

PROGNOSIS IN SO-CALLED SCIATIC NEURITIS Abstract IN RECENT years a common neurologic disease called sciatic neuritis has been found to be caused, in the majority of cases, by herniation of the nucleus pulposus in a lower lumbar intervertebral disk with pressure on nerve roots of the cauda equina. Aware of the belief of some authors that primary sciatic neuritis is a distinct clinical entity (Alpers, Gaskill and Weiss1), I maintain that the symptoms and signs of herniation of the nucleus pulposus in the fourth or fifth lumbar intervertebral disk are indistinguishable from the well defined syndrome that was formerly called sciatic neuritis. Cessation of pain after removal of herniated nuclei has been so impressive that whenever this characteristic syndrome appears the question of spinal operation demands consideration. However, cessation of pain has been observed without spinal operation with sufficient frequency to justify the assumption that the defect may be repaired by natural processes. Indeed, there References 1. Alpers, B. J.; Gaskill, H. S., and Weiss, B. P.: The Problem of Primary Sciatic Neuritis: An Analysis of Fifty-Five Cases , Am. J. M. Sc. 205:625 ( (May) ) 1943.Crossref 2. Ekvall, S.: Enquête clinique, au printemps de 1938, sur les cas de sciatique observés durant les années 1933 et 1934 , Acta med. Scandinav. 101:1, 1939.Crossref 3. Grant, F. G.: Operative Results in Intervertebral Discs , J. Neurosurg. 1:332 ( (Sept.) ) 1944.Crossref 4. From the Department of Surgery, New York Hospital, and Cornell University Medical College. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

PROGNOSIS IN SO-CALLED SCIATIC NEURITIS

Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry , Volume 55 (6) – Jun 1, 1946

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1946 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6754
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1946.02300170017002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract IN RECENT years a common neurologic disease called sciatic neuritis has been found to be caused, in the majority of cases, by herniation of the nucleus pulposus in a lower lumbar intervertebral disk with pressure on nerve roots of the cauda equina. Aware of the belief of some authors that primary sciatic neuritis is a distinct clinical entity (Alpers, Gaskill and Weiss1), I maintain that the symptoms and signs of herniation of the nucleus pulposus in the fourth or fifth lumbar intervertebral disk are indistinguishable from the well defined syndrome that was formerly called sciatic neuritis. Cessation of pain after removal of herniated nuclei has been so impressive that whenever this characteristic syndrome appears the question of spinal operation demands consideration. However, cessation of pain has been observed without spinal operation with sufficient frequency to justify the assumption that the defect may be repaired by natural processes. Indeed, there References 1. Alpers, B. J.; Gaskill, H. S., and Weiss, B. P.: The Problem of Primary Sciatic Neuritis: An Analysis of Fifty-Five Cases , Am. J. M. Sc. 205:625 ( (May) ) 1943.Crossref 2. Ekvall, S.: Enquête clinique, au printemps de 1938, sur les cas de sciatique observés durant les années 1933 et 1934 , Acta med. Scandinav. 101:1, 1939.Crossref 3. Grant, F. G.: Operative Results in Intervertebral Discs , J. Neurosurg. 1:332 ( (Sept.) ) 1944.Crossref 4. From the Department of Surgery, New York Hospital, and Cornell University Medical College.

Journal

Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1946

References