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Profound Deafness: Associated Sensory and Neural Degeneration

Profound Deafness: Associated Sensory and Neural Degeneration Abstract • The cases of deafness presented here have been selected primarily to illustrate the degree to which the acoustic ganglion has degenerated in profound or total deafness. Examples of seven types of acquired diseases of the inner ear and one type of probable congenital degeneration of uncertain cause are given. The number of surviving ganglion cells in each 5-mm section of the cochlea has been expressed as a percentage of the normal average count corresponding to that section of the organ of Corti. The state of the acoustic ganglion has been correlated with that of the organ of Corti and the peripheral axons. Attention is directed to factors other than the presence of ganglion cells, such as disease of the labyrinthine capsule and/or labyrinthitis ossificans, that may influence the possibility of successful insertion of a cochlear implant. (Arch Otolaryngol 106:193-209, 1980) References 1. Otte J, Schuknecht HF, Kerr AG: Ganglion cell populations in normal and pathological human cochlea: Implications for cochlear implantation . Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 88:1231-1246, 1978. 2. Bodian D: A new method for staining fibers and nerve endings in mounted paraffin sections . Anat Rec 65:89-97, 1936.Crossref 3. Guild SR: A graphic reconstruction method for the study of the organ of Corti . Anat Rec 22:141-157, 1921.Crossref 4. Guild SR, Crowe SJ, Bunch CC, et al: Correlations of differences in the density of innervation of the organ of Corti with differences in the acuity of hearing, including evidence as to the location in the human cochlea of the receptors for certain tones . Acta Otolaryngol 15:269-308, 1931.Crossref 5. Schuknecht HF: Techniques for study of cochlear function and pathology in experimental animals: Development of the anatomical frequency scale for the cat . Arch Otolaryngol 58:377-397, 1953.Crossref 6. Perlman HB, Lindsay JR: Relation of the internal ear spaces to the meninges . Arch Otolaryngol 29:12-23, 1939.Crossref 7. Hagens EW: Pathology of the inner ear in a case of deafness from epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis . Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 49:168-176, 1940. 8. Henneford GE, Lindsay JR: Deaf-mutism due to meningogenic labyrinthitis . Laryngoscope 78:251-261, 1968.Crossref 9. Matz GJ, Lockhart HB, Lindsay JR: Meningitis following stapedectomy . Laryngoscope 78:251-261, 1968.Crossref 10. Suga F, Lindsay JR: Labyrinthitis ossificans . Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 86:17-30, 1977. 11. Cohn AM, House HP, Lindsay JR: Deafness in early childhood . Laryngoscope 70:1665-1679, 1970.Crossref 12. Lindsay JR, Hemenway WG: Inner ear pathology due to measles . Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 63:754-771, 1954. 13. Lindsay JR, Davy PR, Ward PH: Inner ear pathology in deafness due to mumps . Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 69:918-935, 1960. 14. Fredrickson JM, Griffith AW, Lindsay JR: Transverse fracture of the temporal bone: A clinical and histopathological study . Arch Otolaryngol 78:770-784, 1963.Crossref 15. Lindsay JR, Zajtchuk J: Concussion of the inner ear . Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 79:699-710, 1970. 16. Suga F, Lindsay JR: Histopathological observations of presbycusis . Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 85:169-175, 1976. 17. Lindsay JR: Histopathology of otosclerosis . Arch Otolaryngol 97:24-29, 1973.Crossref 18. Lidnsay JR, Hinojosa R: Histopathologic features of the inner ear associated with KearnsSayre syndrome . Arch Otolaryngol 102:747-752, 1976.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Profound Deafness: Associated Sensory and Neural Degeneration

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 106 (4) – Apr 1, 1980

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1980 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1980.00790280001001
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract • The cases of deafness presented here have been selected primarily to illustrate the degree to which the acoustic ganglion has degenerated in profound or total deafness. Examples of seven types of acquired diseases of the inner ear and one type of probable congenital degeneration of uncertain cause are given. The number of surviving ganglion cells in each 5-mm section of the cochlea has been expressed as a percentage of the normal average count corresponding to that section of the organ of Corti. The state of the acoustic ganglion has been correlated with that of the organ of Corti and the peripheral axons. Attention is directed to factors other than the presence of ganglion cells, such as disease of the labyrinthine capsule and/or labyrinthitis ossificans, that may influence the possibility of successful insertion of a cochlear implant. (Arch Otolaryngol 106:193-209, 1980) References 1. Otte J, Schuknecht HF, Kerr AG: Ganglion cell populations in normal and pathological human cochlea: Implications for cochlear implantation . Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 88:1231-1246, 1978. 2. Bodian D: A new method for staining fibers and nerve endings in mounted paraffin sections . Anat Rec 65:89-97, 1936.Crossref 3. Guild SR: A graphic reconstruction method for the study of the organ of Corti . Anat Rec 22:141-157, 1921.Crossref 4. Guild SR, Crowe SJ, Bunch CC, et al: Correlations of differences in the density of innervation of the organ of Corti with differences in the acuity of hearing, including evidence as to the location in the human cochlea of the receptors for certain tones . Acta Otolaryngol 15:269-308, 1931.Crossref 5. Schuknecht HF: Techniques for study of cochlear function and pathology in experimental animals: Development of the anatomical frequency scale for the cat . Arch Otolaryngol 58:377-397, 1953.Crossref 6. Perlman HB, Lindsay JR: Relation of the internal ear spaces to the meninges . Arch Otolaryngol 29:12-23, 1939.Crossref 7. Hagens EW: Pathology of the inner ear in a case of deafness from epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis . Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 49:168-176, 1940. 8. Henneford GE, Lindsay JR: Deaf-mutism due to meningogenic labyrinthitis . Laryngoscope 78:251-261, 1968.Crossref 9. Matz GJ, Lockhart HB, Lindsay JR: Meningitis following stapedectomy . Laryngoscope 78:251-261, 1968.Crossref 10. Suga F, Lindsay JR: Labyrinthitis ossificans . Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 86:17-30, 1977. 11. Cohn AM, House HP, Lindsay JR: Deafness in early childhood . Laryngoscope 70:1665-1679, 1970.Crossref 12. Lindsay JR, Hemenway WG: Inner ear pathology due to measles . Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 63:754-771, 1954. 13. Lindsay JR, Davy PR, Ward PH: Inner ear pathology in deafness due to mumps . Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 69:918-935, 1960. 14. Fredrickson JM, Griffith AW, Lindsay JR: Transverse fracture of the temporal bone: A clinical and histopathological study . Arch Otolaryngol 78:770-784, 1963.Crossref 15. Lindsay JR, Zajtchuk J: Concussion of the inner ear . Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 79:699-710, 1970. 16. Suga F, Lindsay JR: Histopathological observations of presbycusis . Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 85:169-175, 1976. 17. Lindsay JR: Histopathology of otosclerosis . Arch Otolaryngol 97:24-29, 1973.Crossref 18. Lidnsay JR, Hinojosa R: Histopathologic features of the inner ear associated with KearnsSayre syndrome . Arch Otolaryngol 102:747-752, 1976.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1980

References