Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Professional Frankness from the Standpoint of Ethics.

Professional Frankness from the Standpoint of Ethics. Knickbocker, Texas, May 23, 1900. To the Editor: —I have long been of the opinion that doctors are too often not sufficiently frank with their patients. It is a matter of every-day experience that patients very often are not entirely frank with their medical advisers. I do not hold it to be a duty of the doctor to tell the patient the name and properties of the medicament which he prescribes. To do so is virtually to take the patient into counsel as to the merits or demerits of the remedy in question, and few laymen possess the requisite technical knowledge to qualify them to consult with the doctor on such matters. The exceptional instances only prove the rule. Yet the doctor must be both frank and explicit in his direction as to dietary, mode of life, administration of remedies, etc. To do less than this would be to fall http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Professional Frankness from the Standpoint of Ethics.

JAMA , Volume XXXIV (24) – Jun 16, 1900

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/professional-frankness-from-the-standpoint-of-ethics-LmRdDeQmSC
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1900 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1900.02460240065022
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Knickbocker, Texas, May 23, 1900. To the Editor: —I have long been of the opinion that doctors are too often not sufficiently frank with their patients. It is a matter of every-day experience that patients very often are not entirely frank with their medical advisers. I do not hold it to be a duty of the doctor to tell the patient the name and properties of the medicament which he prescribes. To do so is virtually to take the patient into counsel as to the merits or demerits of the remedy in question, and few laymen possess the requisite technical knowledge to qualify them to consult with the doctor on such matters. The exceptional instances only prove the rule. Yet the doctor must be both frank and explicit in his direction as to dietary, mode of life, administration of remedies, etc. To do less than this would be to fall

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 16, 1900

There are no references for this article.