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PROBLEMS OF HOMOLOGOUS SERUM JAUNDICE AFTER PLASMA TRANSFUSION

PROBLEMS OF HOMOLOGOUS SERUM JAUNDICE AFTER PLASMA TRANSFUSION This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract THE INCIDENCE of homologous serum jaundice after transfusions with pooled plasma is sufficiently high (5-15%) that many have abandoned its use save for the emergency treatment of shock. Although this decision is justified on the basis of clinical experience, it is regrettable that such a conclusion is necessary because we have available no other noncellular protein agent that is as effective in the treatment of shock or in the rapid restoration of the plasma protein concentration of the hypoproteinemia of malnutrition. Moreover, plasma or its fractions are the only portions of blood that can be stored indefinitely; hence the problem arises as to the disposition of plasma currently being collected as this applies to both military and civil defense. The infectious agent responsible for homologous serum jaundice is considered to be a virus. Because only a small amount of an infected plasma is necessary to produce the disease, one unit http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives Surgery American Medical Association

PROBLEMS OF HOMOLOGOUS SERUM JAUNDICE AFTER PLASMA TRANSFUSION

A.M.A. Archives Surgery , Volume 64 (1) – Jan 1, 1952

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1952 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6908
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260010012001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract THE INCIDENCE of homologous serum jaundice after transfusions with pooled plasma is sufficiently high (5-15%) that many have abandoned its use save for the emergency treatment of shock. Although this decision is justified on the basis of clinical experience, it is regrettable that such a conclusion is necessary because we have available no other noncellular protein agent that is as effective in the treatment of shock or in the rapid restoration of the plasma protein concentration of the hypoproteinemia of malnutrition. Moreover, plasma or its fractions are the only portions of blood that can be stored indefinitely; hence the problem arises as to the disposition of plasma currently being collected as this applies to both military and civil defense. The infectious agent responsible for homologous serum jaundice is considered to be a virus. Because only a small amount of an infected plasma is necessary to produce the disease, one unit

Journal

A.M.A. Archives SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1952

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