Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

PROBLEMS IN REHABILITATION OF THE HEMIPLEGIC PATIENT

PROBLEMS IN REHABILITATION OF THE HEMIPLEGIC PATIENT The new philosophy of the treatment of hemiplegia emphasizes attention to the portions of the body that remain functional. But it must be recognized that brain damage limits the goals of rehabilitation. Among the 122 patients here studied, there were 23 judged to be physically able to return to work, but of the 11 with right-sided hemiplegia, 6 are now employed, while of the 12 with left-sided hemiplegia, only 2 are now employed. Vocational rehabilitation was thus more likely in patients with involvement of the dominant hemisphere. Much can be done for the patient during the first 7 to 10 days of flaccidity, during the ensuing period of spasticity, and finally during the period of retraining in ambulation and self-care By early and persistent use of what is available, especially in the choice of assistive devices, many hemiplegic patients can be made self-sufficient, thus relieving their families and friends of much of the burden of their care. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

PROBLEMS IN REHABILITATION OF THE HEMIPLEGIC PATIENT

JAMA , Volume 169 (3) – Jan 17, 1959

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/problems-in-rehabilitation-of-the-hemiplegic-patient-dedSkIWDq0
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1959.03000200022005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The new philosophy of the treatment of hemiplegia emphasizes attention to the portions of the body that remain functional. But it must be recognized that brain damage limits the goals of rehabilitation. Among the 122 patients here studied, there were 23 judged to be physically able to return to work, but of the 11 with right-sided hemiplegia, 6 are now employed, while of the 12 with left-sided hemiplegia, only 2 are now employed. Vocational rehabilitation was thus more likely in patients with involvement of the dominant hemisphere. Much can be done for the patient during the first 7 to 10 days of flaccidity, during the ensuing period of spasticity, and finally during the period of retraining in ambulation and self-care By early and persistent use of what is available, especially in the choice of assistive devices, many hemiplegic patients can be made self-sufficient, thus relieving their families and friends of much of the burden of their care.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 17, 1959

There are no references for this article.