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Problems in Record-Keeping: A New Approach Toward the Preservation of Continuity

Problems in Record-Keeping: A New Approach Toward the Preservation of Continuity Abstract Nephrology has been the simultaneous beneficiary and victim of the development of patient-care methodologies requiring frequent patient-physician encounters. The incorporation of hemodialysis and transplantation into practice has led to a wide variety of vexing and perplexing clinical problems of a long-term nature. The use of these "half-way Technologies"1 has also spawned voluminous quantities of paperwork. Longitudinal care of patients receiving these forms of therapy not only generates considerable quantities of information, but requires frequent review and correlation of previously obtained data. Such review and the performance of the necessary functions of correlating specific events frequently require exasperating, time-consuming searches of the traditional hospital record. This process becomes virtually impossible if the physician must correlate historical, physical, or laboratory data obtained as an outpatient or during previous hospitalizations with a new or changing problem. Thus, patient care, medical economy, and physicians' psyches frequently suffer in exponential fashion. The article by References 1. Thomas L: Notes of a biology-watcher: The technology of medicine . N Engl J Med 285:1366-1368, 1971.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Problems in Record-Keeping: A New Approach Toward the Preservation of Continuity

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 137 (4) – Apr 1, 1977

Problems in Record-Keeping: A New Approach Toward the Preservation of Continuity

Abstract

Abstract Nephrology has been the simultaneous beneficiary and victim of the development of patient-care methodologies requiring frequent patient-physician encounters. The incorporation of hemodialysis and transplantation into practice has led to a wide variety of vexing and perplexing clinical problems of a long-term nature. The use of these "half-way Technologies"1 has also spawned voluminous quantities of paperwork. Longitudinal care of patients receiving these forms of therapy...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1977 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1977.03630160010005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Nephrology has been the simultaneous beneficiary and victim of the development of patient-care methodologies requiring frequent patient-physician encounters. The incorporation of hemodialysis and transplantation into practice has led to a wide variety of vexing and perplexing clinical problems of a long-term nature. The use of these "half-way Technologies"1 has also spawned voluminous quantities of paperwork. Longitudinal care of patients receiving these forms of therapy not only generates considerable quantities of information, but requires frequent review and correlation of previously obtained data. Such review and the performance of the necessary functions of correlating specific events frequently require exasperating, time-consuming searches of the traditional hospital record. This process becomes virtually impossible if the physician must correlate historical, physical, or laboratory data obtained as an outpatient or during previous hospitalizations with a new or changing problem. Thus, patient care, medical economy, and physicians' psyches frequently suffer in exponential fashion. The article by References 1. Thomas L: Notes of a biology-watcher: The technology of medicine . N Engl J Med 285:1366-1368, 1971.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1977

References