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Privacy Threats When Seeking Online Health Information

Privacy Threats When Seeking Online Health Information Letters to pay for it.” It seems that many are flying first class when we Unfortunately, neither assumption may be true. Anonym- cannot really afford it. ity is threatened by the visible Internet address of the pa- Although these data demonstrate that endoscopy nurses tient’s computer or the often unique configuration of the pa- and physicians prefer propofol, it seems that there is a large tient’s web browser. Confidentiality is threatened by the difference between actual cost and perceived value. leakage of information to third parties through code on web- sites (eg, iframes, conversion pixels, social media plug-ins) or Deepak Agrawal, MD, MPH implanted on patients’ computers (eg, cookies, beacons). Don C. Rockey, MD Many third parties use the information they collect only to target advertising (eg, DoubleClick). However, nearly 300 Author Affiliations: Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, University of third parties use the information to track consumers, deliv- Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (Agrawal); Department of Internal ering advertising related more directly to the user’s known Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston (Rockey). or inferred interests, demographics, and prior online Corresponding Author: Don C. Rockey, MD, Department of Internal Medicine, behavior. Medical University of South Carolina, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Privacy Threats When Seeking Online Health Information

JAMA Internal Medicine , Volume 173 (19) – Oct 28, 2013

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.7795
pmid
23835776
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Letters to pay for it.” It seems that many are flying first class when we Unfortunately, neither assumption may be true. Anonym- cannot really afford it. ity is threatened by the visible Internet address of the pa- Although these data demonstrate that endoscopy nurses tient’s computer or the often unique configuration of the pa- and physicians prefer propofol, it seems that there is a large tient’s web browser. Confidentiality is threatened by the difference between actual cost and perceived value. leakage of information to third parties through code on web- sites (eg, iframes, conversion pixels, social media plug-ins) or Deepak Agrawal, MD, MPH implanted on patients’ computers (eg, cookies, beacons). Don C. Rockey, MD Many third parties use the information they collect only to target advertising (eg, DoubleClick). However, nearly 300 Author Affiliations: Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, University of third parties use the information to track consumers, deliv- Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (Agrawal); Department of Internal ering advertising related more directly to the user’s known Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston (Rockey). or inferred interests, demographics, and prior online Corresponding Author: Don C. Rockey, MD, Department of Internal Medicine, behavior. Medical University of South Carolina,

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 28, 2013

References