Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Prevention of Schistosomiasis-Reply

Prevention of Schistosomiasis-Reply In Reply.— We appreciate Dr Karstorp's firsthand account of the trip, with her reemphasis on the surprisingly short incubation period for acute schistosomiasis and elaboration on some of the possible protective measures. We were not sufficiently precise in referring to concentrations of chlorine or iodine needed to kill cercariae. The figure of 1 ppm in our report refers to a concentration of free residual chlorine, correctly stated by Dr Karstorp. In general, water purification preparations used according to general instructions should achieve cercariacidal concentrations of free residual chlorine or iodine.1 The risk of contracting schistosomiasis is far greater from bathing, swimming, wading, or similar activities with a relatively long exposure to large volumes of cercaria-infested water, than from brief oral exposure to small volumes of the same water. Filtration, heating, or chemical treatment, while recommended for drinking water and for situations in which bathing water can be pretreated, do http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Prevention of Schistosomiasis-Reply

JAMA , Volume 252 (22) – Dec 14, 1984

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/prevention-of-schistosomiasis-reply-lBPs2cGHDz
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1984.03350220037019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In Reply.— We appreciate Dr Karstorp's firsthand account of the trip, with her reemphasis on the surprisingly short incubation period for acute schistosomiasis and elaboration on some of the possible protective measures. We were not sufficiently precise in referring to concentrations of chlorine or iodine needed to kill cercariae. The figure of 1 ppm in our report refers to a concentration of free residual chlorine, correctly stated by Dr Karstorp. In general, water purification preparations used according to general instructions should achieve cercariacidal concentrations of free residual chlorine or iodine.1 The risk of contracting schistosomiasis is far greater from bathing, swimming, wading, or similar activities with a relatively long exposure to large volumes of cercaria-infested water, than from brief oral exposure to small volumes of the same water. Filtration, heating, or chemical treatment, while recommended for drinking water and for situations in which bathing water can be pretreated, do

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 14, 1984

There are no references for this article.