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Preventing the Emergence of Antimicrobial Resistance

Preventing the Emergence of Antimicrobial Resistance The emerging global problem of antimicrobial resistance has multiple aspects and involves multiple pathogens. One common theme is that antimicrobial drug use exerts selective pressure favoring the emergence of resistance. Strategies to prevent the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance depend on the pathogens. For bacterial respiratory tract pathogens (eg, Streptococcus pneumoniae), controlling outpatient antimicrobial use is crucial1-3; for some enteric pathogens (eg, Salmonella), limiting antimicrobial use in animals is important4,5; and, for pathogens that cause nosocomial infections, improving inpatient antimicrobial use and infection control practices is necessary.6 Addressing antimicrobial use and resistance is one of the most urgent priorities in confronting emerging infectious disease threats.7,8 See also p 901. Respiratory infections account for more than three quarters of the antimicrobial drug prescriptions written annually in physicians' offices.9 In this issue of JAMA, Gonzales et al10 identify antibiotic prescribing for adults with colds, nonspecific http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Preventing the Emergence of Antimicrobial Resistance

JAMA , Volume 278 (11) – Sep 17, 1997

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1997.03550110082041
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The emerging global problem of antimicrobial resistance has multiple aspects and involves multiple pathogens. One common theme is that antimicrobial drug use exerts selective pressure favoring the emergence of resistance. Strategies to prevent the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance depend on the pathogens. For bacterial respiratory tract pathogens (eg, Streptococcus pneumoniae), controlling outpatient antimicrobial use is crucial1-3; for some enteric pathogens (eg, Salmonella), limiting antimicrobial use in animals is important4,5; and, for pathogens that cause nosocomial infections, improving inpatient antimicrobial use and infection control practices is necessary.6 Addressing antimicrobial use and resistance is one of the most urgent priorities in confronting emerging infectious disease threats.7,8 See also p 901. Respiratory infections account for more than three quarters of the antimicrobial drug prescriptions written annually in physicians' offices.9 In this issue of JAMA, Gonzales et al10 identify antibiotic prescribing for adults with colds, nonspecific

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 17, 1997

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