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Preventing Obesity in Children

Preventing Obesity in Children Opinion EDITORIAL A Glimmer of Hope Jody W. Zylke, MD; Howard Bauchner, MD The intractable and relentless epidemic of child and adoles- 90% were retained at 3 years. Despite the breadth and inten- sity of the intervention, the high retention rate, and good cent obesity has been well documented. Beginning about 30 years ago, the weight of children and adolescents began to in- adherence, the primary outcome—body mass index (BMI) crease, although the preva- trajectory over 36 months—was not significantly different lence of obesity has been rela- between groups, and the BMI in both groups was 17.8. Of the Related articles pages 450 and tively stable between 2007 secondary outcomes, the intervention group had lower mean and 2016. Nevertheless, the daily caloric intake and used community centers more fre- prevalence of obesity and severe obesity was high in 2015- quently than controls. 2016: among children 2 to 5 years old, 14% were obese and Paul and colleagues conducted a smaller, single-center 2% severely obese; among children 6 to 11 years old, 18% clinical trial of an intervention beginning much earlier—at 2 were obese and 5% severely obese; and among adolescents weeks after delivery—comparing a responsive parenting in- 12 to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Preventing Obesity in Children

JAMA , Volume 320 (5) – Aug 7, 2018

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2018.9442
pmid
30087991
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion EDITORIAL A Glimmer of Hope Jody W. Zylke, MD; Howard Bauchner, MD The intractable and relentless epidemic of child and adoles- 90% were retained at 3 years. Despite the breadth and inten- sity of the intervention, the high retention rate, and good cent obesity has been well documented. Beginning about 30 years ago, the weight of children and adolescents began to in- adherence, the primary outcome—body mass index (BMI) crease, although the preva- trajectory over 36 months—was not significantly different lence of obesity has been rela- between groups, and the BMI in both groups was 17.8. Of the Related articles pages 450 and tively stable between 2007 secondary outcomes, the intervention group had lower mean and 2016. Nevertheless, the daily caloric intake and used community centers more fre- prevalence of obesity and severe obesity was high in 2015- quently than controls. 2016: among children 2 to 5 years old, 14% were obese and Paul and colleagues conducted a smaller, single-center 2% severely obese; among children 6 to 11 years old, 18% clinical trial of an intervention beginning much earlier—at 2 were obese and 5% severely obese; and among adolescents weeks after delivery—comparing a responsive parenting in- 12 to

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 7, 2018

References