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Preventing Health Care–Associated Harm in Children

Preventing Health Care–Associated Harm in Children Opinion Preventing Health Care–Associated Harm VIEWPOINT in Children Injuriesduetomedicalcarecontinuetoaffectsubstan- iteratively refines and improves their positive predic- Kathleen E. Walsh, MD, MSc tial numbers of children; estimates range from 15% to tive value, automated triggers will likely replace 1,2 Department of 35% of hospitalized children. Although such harms are manual medical record review as a means of measur- Pediatrics, Cincinnati common in all patients, children are at substantial risk ing trends in harm in children. In addition, robust mea- Children’s Hospital, forhealthcare–associatedharmbecauseofmanyunique sures will be needed to detect harm in the outpatient University of Cincinnati School of Medicine, factors, including the complexity of weight-based medi- setting, including home medication use, ambulatory Cincinnati, Ohio. cationdosing,alackofmedicationsolutionsmadeincon- procedures, clinic infusions, and other areas. Medica- centrations for children, or technology, such as com- tion error rates and associated injuries in the ambula- David G. Bundy, MD, puter order entry, which may not always have specific tory setting may, in high-risk populations, be as high MPH pediatric dose limits. As pediatric patient safety prac- as in hospitalized children. Department of Pediatrics, Medical tices and research evolve, there has been progress to- University of South wardthegoalofeliminatinghealthcare–associatedharm Multisite Research Carolina, Charleston. to children. As the science of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Preventing Health Care–Associated Harm in Children

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2014.2038
pmid
24794361
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion Preventing Health Care–Associated Harm VIEWPOINT in Children Injuriesduetomedicalcarecontinuetoaffectsubstan- iteratively refines and improves their positive predic- Kathleen E. Walsh, MD, MSc tial numbers of children; estimates range from 15% to tive value, automated triggers will likely replace 1,2 Department of 35% of hospitalized children. Although such harms are manual medical record review as a means of measur- Pediatrics, Cincinnati common in all patients, children are at substantial risk ing trends in harm in children. In addition, robust mea- Children’s Hospital, forhealthcare–associatedharmbecauseofmanyunique sures will be needed to detect harm in the outpatient University of Cincinnati School of Medicine, factors, including the complexity of weight-based medi- setting, including home medication use, ambulatory Cincinnati, Ohio. cationdosing,alackofmedicationsolutionsmadeincon- procedures, clinic infusions, and other areas. Medica- centrations for children, or technology, such as com- tion error rates and associated injuries in the ambula- David G. Bundy, MD, puter order entry, which may not always have specific tory setting may, in high-risk populations, be as high MPH pediatric dose limits. As pediatric patient safety prac- as in hospitalized children. Department of Pediatrics, Medical tices and research evolve, there has been progress to- University of South wardthegoalofeliminatinghealthcare–associatedharm Multisite Research Carolina, Charleston. to children. As the science of

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 7, 2014

References