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PREMEDICATION-AN OLD IDEA AND NEW DRUGS

PREMEDICATION-AN OLD IDEA AND NEW DRUGS Drugs to be used as premedicants before general or local anesthesia is induced must be selected with due regard to the patient's physical and mental state, the major anesthetic to be used, and the technique of administration. They should be prescribed by the person assigned to administer the anesthetic. Their purpose is to relieve the patient's anxiety, to reduce the amount of troublesome mucous secretions, to intensify the desired effect or reduce the required amount of the major anesthetic, and to decrease the incidence of complications of anesthesia, such as cardiac arrest, laryngospasm, and bronchial spasm. It is doubtful whether any of the drugs recently introduced for these purposes are preferable to the customary combination of a narcotic and a belladonna alkaloid. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

PREMEDICATION-AN OLD IDEA AND NEW DRUGS

JAMA , Volume 171 (8) – Oct 24, 1959

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1959.03010260042008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Drugs to be used as premedicants before general or local anesthesia is induced must be selected with due regard to the patient's physical and mental state, the major anesthetic to be used, and the technique of administration. They should be prescribed by the person assigned to administer the anesthetic. Their purpose is to relieve the patient's anxiety, to reduce the amount of troublesome mucous secretions, to intensify the desired effect or reduce the required amount of the major anesthetic, and to decrease the incidence of complications of anesthesia, such as cardiac arrest, laryngospasm, and bronchial spasm. It is doubtful whether any of the drugs recently introduced for these purposes are preferable to the customary combination of a narcotic and a belladonna alkaloid.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 24, 1959

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