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Preliminary Bacteriological Studies of the Arterialized Canine Liver

Preliminary Bacteriological Studies of the Arterialized Canine Liver Abstract Introduction It is now well known that the liver of the dog harbors a spore-bearing anaerobe of the Clostridium species.1,2 In view of the suspected role of clostridia in causing death from irreversible shock, intestinal obstruction, acute pancreatic necrosis, and ischemic hepatic necrosis, the detailed bacteriological study both of dog and of man urgently needs to be done. It could be that one is here dealing with an organism harbored in the intestinal tract, periodically embolizing the portal blood stream, and causing death when conditions are suitable for its proliferation. It is fortunate for the study of this infection that the clostridia are very sensitive to penicillin; this fact resulted in the finding that complete ligation of the hepatic artery in dogs protected by penicillin permits the liver to function adequately in the absence of gross quantities of arterial blood. The inference is unavoidable that when death occurs after References 1. Wolbach, S. B., and Saiki, T.: A New Anaerobic Spore-Bearing Bacterium Commonly Present in the Livers of Healthy Dogs , J. M. Res. 21:267, 1909-1910. 2. Schweinburg, F. B.; Frank, H. A., and Fine, J.: Bacterial Factor in Experimental Hemorrhagic Shock , Am. J. Physiol. 179:532, 1954. 3. Cobb, L. M.: Experimental Arterialization of the Canine Liver Using an Aortic-Caval Fistula and a Reverse-Eck Fistula, A. M. A. Arch. Surg., this issue, p. 543. 4. Smith, L.: Introduction to Pathogenic Anaerobes , Chicago, The University of Chicago Press, 1954. 5. Jacobs, S.; Weizel H.; Gordon, E., and others: Bacterial Action in Development of Irreversibility to Transfusion in Haemorrhagic Shock in the Dog , Am. J. Physiol. 179:523, 1954. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives Surgery American Medical Association

Preliminary Bacteriological Studies of the Arterialized Canine Liver

A.M.A. Archives Surgery , Volume 78 (4) – Apr 1, 1959

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6908
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1959.04320040042012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Introduction It is now well known that the liver of the dog harbors a spore-bearing anaerobe of the Clostridium species.1,2 In view of the suspected role of clostridia in causing death from irreversible shock, intestinal obstruction, acute pancreatic necrosis, and ischemic hepatic necrosis, the detailed bacteriological study both of dog and of man urgently needs to be done. It could be that one is here dealing with an organism harbored in the intestinal tract, periodically embolizing the portal blood stream, and causing death when conditions are suitable for its proliferation. It is fortunate for the study of this infection that the clostridia are very sensitive to penicillin; this fact resulted in the finding that complete ligation of the hepatic artery in dogs protected by penicillin permits the liver to function adequately in the absence of gross quantities of arterial blood. The inference is unavoidable that when death occurs after References 1. Wolbach, S. B., and Saiki, T.: A New Anaerobic Spore-Bearing Bacterium Commonly Present in the Livers of Healthy Dogs , J. M. Res. 21:267, 1909-1910. 2. Schweinburg, F. B.; Frank, H. A., and Fine, J.: Bacterial Factor in Experimental Hemorrhagic Shock , Am. J. Physiol. 179:532, 1954. 3. Cobb, L. M.: Experimental Arterialization of the Canine Liver Using an Aortic-Caval Fistula and a Reverse-Eck Fistula, A. M. A. Arch. Surg., this issue, p. 543. 4. Smith, L.: Introduction to Pathogenic Anaerobes , Chicago, The University of Chicago Press, 1954. 5. Jacobs, S.; Weizel H.; Gordon, E., and others: Bacterial Action in Development of Irreversibility to Transfusion in Haemorrhagic Shock in the Dog , Am. J. Physiol. 179:523, 1954.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1959

References