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Predictive Markers for Clostridium perfringens Sepsis in High-Risk Newborns

Predictive Markers for Clostridium perfringens Sepsis in High-Risk Newborns Abstract Sir.—Warren et al1 suggest that massive hemolysis in the newborn with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) may be due to Clostridium perfringens infection. In our experience, by the time massive hemolysis is manifest, systemic spread of C perfringens, its toxin, or both will have occurred, and institution of appropriate antibiotic therapy will probably be too late. We have carried out a long-term study on the patterns of the development of the enteric microflora in preterm neonates at high risk for NEC. Our data suggest that early appearance of C perfringens in the feces of low-birth-weight, preterm infants may predict NEC.2 Although C perfringens appears early in the full-term infant's stool (depending on feed composition),3 colonization patterns in preterm infants differ,4 and therefore recognition of C perfringens in the feces provides a valuable marker for contamination. Furthermore, timing of colonization with C perfringens during the first 2 weeks References 1. Warren S, Schreiber JR, Epstein MF: Necrotizing enterocolitis and hemolysis associated with Clostridium perfringens . AJDC 1984; 138:686-692. 2. Blakey JL, Lubitz L, Campbell NT, et al: Enteric colonisation in sporadic neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr, in press. 3. Hentges DJ: Does diet influence human fecal microflora composition? Nutr Rev 1980;38: 329-336.Crossref 4. Blakey JL, Lubitz L, Barnes GL, et al: Development of gut colonisation in pre-term neonates . J Med Microbiol 1982;15:519-529.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Predictive Markers for Clostridium perfringens Sepsis in High-Risk Newborns

Predictive Markers for Clostridium perfringens Sepsis in High-Risk Newborns

Abstract

Abstract Sir.—Warren et al1 suggest that massive hemolysis in the newborn with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) may be due to Clostridium perfringens infection. In our experience, by the time massive hemolysis is manifest, systemic spread of C perfringens, its toxin, or both will have occurred, and institution of appropriate antibiotic therapy will probably be too late. We have carried out a long-term study on the patterns of the development of the enteric microflora in preterm neonates...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1986.02140150012016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Sir.—Warren et al1 suggest that massive hemolysis in the newborn with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) may be due to Clostridium perfringens infection. In our experience, by the time massive hemolysis is manifest, systemic spread of C perfringens, its toxin, or both will have occurred, and institution of appropriate antibiotic therapy will probably be too late. We have carried out a long-term study on the patterns of the development of the enteric microflora in preterm neonates at high risk for NEC. Our data suggest that early appearance of C perfringens in the feces of low-birth-weight, preterm infants may predict NEC.2 Although C perfringens appears early in the full-term infant's stool (depending on feed composition),3 colonization patterns in preterm infants differ,4 and therefore recognition of C perfringens in the feces provides a valuable marker for contamination. Furthermore, timing of colonization with C perfringens during the first 2 weeks References 1. Warren S, Schreiber JR, Epstein MF: Necrotizing enterocolitis and hemolysis associated with Clostridium perfringens . AJDC 1984; 138:686-692. 2. Blakey JL, Lubitz L, Campbell NT, et al: Enteric colonisation in sporadic neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr, in press. 3. Hentges DJ: Does diet influence human fecal microflora composition? Nutr Rev 1980;38: 329-336.Crossref 4. Blakey JL, Lubitz L, Barnes GL, et al: Development of gut colonisation in pre-term neonates . J Med Microbiol 1982;15:519-529.Crossref

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1986

References