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Predicting Coronary Heart Disease

Predicting Coronary Heart Disease The probability of the development of coronary heart disease can now be defined with considerable accuracy. The probability of the development of clinical disease in middle-aged men with various combinations of risk factors in the upper range is somewhere between one and two chances in five within a ten-year period. When such men are compared with others in the lower ranges of these variables, their excessive risk is of the order of threefold to tenfold, depending on the selection of predisposing factors and the choice of dividing points between "positive" and "negative" test results. Determining the need for preventive measures in a given individual has, therefore, become a matter of rational and quantitative assessment rather than a decision based on an informed and intelligent guess. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Predicting Coronary Heart Disease

JAMA , Volume 201 (11) – Sep 11, 1967

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1967 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1967.03130110021006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The probability of the development of coronary heart disease can now be defined with considerable accuracy. The probability of the development of clinical disease in middle-aged men with various combinations of risk factors in the upper range is somewhere between one and two chances in five within a ten-year period. When such men are compared with others in the lower ranges of these variables, their excessive risk is of the order of threefold to tenfold, depending on the selection of predisposing factors and the choice of dividing points between "positive" and "negative" test results. Determining the need for preventive measures in a given individual has, therefore, become a matter of rational and quantitative assessment rather than a decision based on an informed and intelligent guess.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 11, 1967

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