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Preconceptional Counseling and Intervention Continued

Preconceptional Counseling and Intervention Continued Abstract We are writing in response to a letter by Scarpinato1 that appeared in the May 8, 1995, issue of the Archives. We thank Scarpinato for his interest in our article, "Preconceptional Counseling and Intervention."2 He states that we did not specifically discuss connective tissue diseases at length in our article; we recognize this. The effects of pregnancy on a variety of medical diseases and, contrastingly, medical diseases on pregnancy were beyond the scope of our article. While pregnancy does not usually increase the incidence of major manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus, a woman who has systemic lupus erythematosus has a higher risk of pregnancy complications than one who does not. These risks are even more significant with concomitant hypertension or renal disease.3 Scarpinato mentions the category of preeclampsia and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preconceptional counseling to decrease the risk of disease. The issue of low-dose aspirin References 1. Scarpinato L. More on preconceptional counseling and intervention. Arch Intern Med . 1995;155:990.Crossref 2. Kuller JA, Laifer SA. Preconceptional counseling and intervention. Arch Intern Med . 1994;154:2273-2280.Crossref 3. Cefalo RC, Moos MK. Preconceptional Health Care: A Practical Guide . 2nd ed. St Louis, Mo: Mosby—Year Book; 1995. 4. Sibai BM, Caritis SN, Thom E, et al. Prevention of preeclampsia with low-dose aspirin in healthy, nulliparous pregnant women. N Engl J Med . 1993; 329:1213-1218.Crossref 5. Collaborative Low-Dose Aspirin Study in Pregnancy Group. CLASP: a randomized trial of low-dose aspirin for the prevention and treatment of preeclampsia among 9364 pregnant women. Lancet . 1994;343:619-629.Crossref 6. Fraga CG, Motchnik PA, Shigenaga MK, Helbock HJ, Jacob RA, Ames BN. Ascorbic acid protects against endogenous oxidative DNA damage in human sperm. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA . 1991;88:11003-11006.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Preconceptional Counseling and Intervention Continued

Preconceptional Counseling and Intervention Continued

Abstract

Abstract We are writing in response to a letter by Scarpinato1 that appeared in the May 8, 1995, issue of the Archives. We thank Scarpinato for his interest in our article, "Preconceptional Counseling and Intervention."2 He states that we did not specifically discuss connective tissue diseases at length in our article; we recognize this. The effects of pregnancy on a variety of medical diseases and, contrastingly, medical diseases on pregnancy were beyond the scope of our article....
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1995.00430140137022
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract We are writing in response to a letter by Scarpinato1 that appeared in the May 8, 1995, issue of the Archives. We thank Scarpinato for his interest in our article, "Preconceptional Counseling and Intervention."2 He states that we did not specifically discuss connective tissue diseases at length in our article; we recognize this. The effects of pregnancy on a variety of medical diseases and, contrastingly, medical diseases on pregnancy were beyond the scope of our article. While pregnancy does not usually increase the incidence of major manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus, a woman who has systemic lupus erythematosus has a higher risk of pregnancy complications than one who does not. These risks are even more significant with concomitant hypertension or renal disease.3 Scarpinato mentions the category of preeclampsia and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preconceptional counseling to decrease the risk of disease. The issue of low-dose aspirin References 1. Scarpinato L. More on preconceptional counseling and intervention. Arch Intern Med . 1995;155:990.Crossref 2. Kuller JA, Laifer SA. Preconceptional counseling and intervention. Arch Intern Med . 1994;154:2273-2280.Crossref 3. Cefalo RC, Moos MK. Preconceptional Health Care: A Practical Guide . 2nd ed. St Louis, Mo: Mosby—Year Book; 1995. 4. Sibai BM, Caritis SN, Thom E, et al. Prevention of preeclampsia with low-dose aspirin in healthy, nulliparous pregnant women. N Engl J Med . 1993; 329:1213-1218.Crossref 5. Collaborative Low-Dose Aspirin Study in Pregnancy Group. CLASP: a randomized trial of low-dose aspirin for the prevention and treatment of preeclampsia among 9364 pregnant women. Lancet . 1994;343:619-629.Crossref 6. Fraga CG, Motchnik PA, Shigenaga MK, Helbock HJ, Jacob RA, Ames BN. Ascorbic acid protects against endogenous oxidative DNA damage in human sperm. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA . 1991;88:11003-11006.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 24, 1995

References