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Port-wine Stains

Port-wine Stains Abstract To the Editor.— In their recent article Finley et al1 pointed out some pathologic patterns of port-wine stains (PWSs). They stressed the existence of cases that deviate, clinically and histopathologically, from the typical PWSs (which is a capillary vascular malformation). They particularly insisted on these polypoid small red tumors arising on the surface of adult PWSs, especially on the face.We entirely agree with their pathologic description of an underlying cavernous (ie, capillarovenous) malformation in some cases: this aspect can be demonstrated by selective arteriography. However, we disagree with the term arteriovenous malformation chosen for the pedunculated or sessile polypoid tumors. This must be a conflicting term as arteriovenous malformation is a specific class of vascular malformation, with clinically (ie, murmur and thrill) and radiologically obvious arteriovenous shunts. To clarify clinical diagnosis and therapeutic approaches,2 we believe the time has come to use a clear international classification for References 1. Finley JL, Noe JM, Arndt KA, et al: Port-wine stains: Morphologic variations and developmental lesions . Arch Dermatol 1984;120: (11) :1453-1455.Crossref 2. Mulliken JB, Glowacki J: Hemangiomas and vascular malformations in infants and children: A classification based on endothelial characteristics . Plast Reconstr Surg 1982;69:412-420.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Port-wine Stains

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— In their recent article Finley et al1 pointed out some pathologic patterns of port-wine stains (PWSs). They stressed the existence of cases that deviate, clinically and histopathologically, from the typical PWSs (which is a capillary vascular malformation). They particularly insisted on these polypoid small red tumors arising on the surface of adult PWSs, especially on the face.We entirely agree with their pathologic description of an underlying cavernous (ie,...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1985.01660070022003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— In their recent article Finley et al1 pointed out some pathologic patterns of port-wine stains (PWSs). They stressed the existence of cases that deviate, clinically and histopathologically, from the typical PWSs (which is a capillary vascular malformation). They particularly insisted on these polypoid small red tumors arising on the surface of adult PWSs, especially on the face.We entirely agree with their pathologic description of an underlying cavernous (ie, capillarovenous) malformation in some cases: this aspect can be demonstrated by selective arteriography. However, we disagree with the term arteriovenous malformation chosen for the pedunculated or sessile polypoid tumors. This must be a conflicting term as arteriovenous malformation is a specific class of vascular malformation, with clinically (ie, murmur and thrill) and radiologically obvious arteriovenous shunts. To clarify clinical diagnosis and therapeutic approaches,2 we believe the time has come to use a clear international classification for References 1. Finley JL, Noe JM, Arndt KA, et al: Port-wine stains: Morphologic variations and developmental lesions . Arch Dermatol 1984;120: (11) :1453-1455.Crossref 2. Mulliken JB, Glowacki J: Hemangiomas and vascular malformations in infants and children: A classification based on endothelial characteristics . Plast Reconstr Surg 1982;69:412-420.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1985

References