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Polypill for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention—Reply

Polypill for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention—Reply Letters coccal infection in individuals with human immunodefi- clinicians are happy not to manage a high-risk population, who ciency virus but not in organ transplant recipients, itracon- share both disease etiology and levels of risk with a second- azole helped relieve the symptoms of fever and cutaneous ary prevention cohort, is questionable. The group does, how- lesions in the patient. But the azole antifungal agent did not ever, require at least a modicum of screening to define it. eliminate the cryptococcus and the patient eventually died of Combination therapy may also promote reliance on medi- cryptococcosis progression. cation, not addressing the underlying causes of cardiovascu- Appropriate therapy for disseminated cryptococcosis re- lar disease risk. Generation after generation will require mains important to consider. A recent study supports the fact therapy, essentially placing a bandage over the underlying and that the rapid killing of yeast at the site of infection translates persisting societal cardiovascular disease risk. into better outcomes. The combination therapy of amphoteri- An important question in public health is whether there cin B with flucytosine was demonstrated to provide superior di- are effective alternatives—in this case there are. Cardiovascu- rect antifungal activity and survival. It is the optimal http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Polypill for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention—Reply

JAMA , Volume 310 (7) – Aug 21, 2013

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2013.16373
pmid
23989317
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Letters coccal infection in individuals with human immunodefi- clinicians are happy not to manage a high-risk population, who ciency virus but not in organ transplant recipients, itracon- share both disease etiology and levels of risk with a second- azole helped relieve the symptoms of fever and cutaneous ary prevention cohort, is questionable. The group does, how- lesions in the patient. But the azole antifungal agent did not ever, require at least a modicum of screening to define it. eliminate the cryptococcus and the patient eventually died of Combination therapy may also promote reliance on medi- cryptococcosis progression. cation, not addressing the underlying causes of cardiovascu- Appropriate therapy for disseminated cryptococcosis re- lar disease risk. Generation after generation will require mains important to consider. A recent study supports the fact therapy, essentially placing a bandage over the underlying and that the rapid killing of yeast at the site of infection translates persisting societal cardiovascular disease risk. into better outcomes. The combination therapy of amphoteri- An important question in public health is whether there cin B with flucytosine was demonstrated to provide superior di- are effective alternatives—in this case there are. Cardiovascu- rect antifungal activity and survival. It is the optimal

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 21, 2013

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