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Polymer-Fume Fever

Polymer-Fume Fever Polymer-fume fever, which is characterized by a tight, gripping sensation in the chest associated with shivering, sore throat, pyrexia, and weakness, is rarely reported in the literature. It follows exposure to the pyrolysis products of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) during heating or machining the polymer, or contamination of cigarettes and pipes. The patient described here suffered more than 40 attacks during a nine-month period, as a result of contamination of cigarettes. The cause of the fever was not recognized for a long time. Lassitude persisted for several months after the last episode, but no evidence has been found of any permanent ill effects. Polymer-fume fever should always be included in textbook lists of causes of fever of unknown origin. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Polymer-Fume Fever

JAMA , Volume 219 (12) – Mar 20, 1972

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1972 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1972.03190380019006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Polymer-fume fever, which is characterized by a tight, gripping sensation in the chest associated with shivering, sore throat, pyrexia, and weakness, is rarely reported in the literature. It follows exposure to the pyrolysis products of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) during heating or machining the polymer, or contamination of cigarettes and pipes. The patient described here suffered more than 40 attacks during a nine-month period, as a result of contamination of cigarettes. The cause of the fever was not recognized for a long time. Lassitude persisted for several months after the last episode, but no evidence has been found of any permanent ill effects. Polymer-fume fever should always be included in textbook lists of causes of fever of unknown origin.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 20, 1972

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