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POLIOMYELITIS VACCINE

POLIOMYELITIS VACCINE To the Editor:— During the week of Nov. 14, 1955, at meetings of the American Public Health Association in Kansas City, the United States Public Health Service released two reports on poliomyelitis. One report on Nov. 15 presented by Dr. Langmuir's group from the Poliomyelitis Surveillance Committee stressed the great effectiveness of one inoculation of the Salk vaccine used in 1955, namely, a 50 to 80% reduction in paralytic poliomyelitis. The other report on Nov. 17, presented by Dr. Scheele, stressed the safety of the current Salk vaccine. The widespread national publicity that followed these reports naturally led the public and medical profession at large to believe that we now had a safe and highly effective vaccine. However, what was not made sufficiently clear in the reports and the press stories that covered the country was that the first report, stressing excellent effectiveness, referred to an earlier model of a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

POLIOMYELITIS VACCINE

JAMA , Volume 160 (3) – Jan 21, 1956

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1956.02960380079023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor:— During the week of Nov. 14, 1955, at meetings of the American Public Health Association in Kansas City, the United States Public Health Service released two reports on poliomyelitis. One report on Nov. 15 presented by Dr. Langmuir's group from the Poliomyelitis Surveillance Committee stressed the great effectiveness of one inoculation of the Salk vaccine used in 1955, namely, a 50 to 80% reduction in paralytic poliomyelitis. The other report on Nov. 17, presented by Dr. Scheele, stressed the safety of the current Salk vaccine. The widespread national publicity that followed these reports naturally led the public and medical profession at large to believe that we now had a safe and highly effective vaccine. However, what was not made sufficiently clear in the reports and the press stories that covered the country was that the first report, stressing excellent effectiveness, referred to an earlier model of a

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 21, 1956

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