Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Plaquenil Sulfate in Treatment of Lupus Erythematosus and Light-Sensitivity Eruptions

Plaquenil Sulfate in Treatment of Lupus Erythematosus and Light-Sensitivity Eruptions Abstract The value of antimalarials in the treatment of lupus erythematosus has been well established since Page's article on the use of quinacrine (mepacrine).1 A recent article by Leeper and Allende2 compared the use of quinacrine, chloroquine, and amodiaquin for this condition and indicated that the latter two were preferable. Also, light-sensitivity eruptions have been successfully treated and recurrences prevented with quinacrine and chloroquine.3,4 Another antimalarial preparation under investigation is Plaquenil sulfate (7-chloro-4-[4-N-ethyl-N-β-hydroxyethylamino-1-methylbutylamino]-quinoline). This drug has also been referred to as Win 1258 and is a synthesized stable colorless crystalline solid. It is supplied in tablets of 0.2 and 0.4 gm. It is a 4-aminoquinoline, differing from chloroquine diphosphate in that one of the terminal ethyl groups on the tertiary amino nitrogen is replaced by a hydroxyethyl group. Plaquenil sulfate has been mentioned by several investigators. Goldman5 felt it was ``certainly less toxic References 1. The Plaquenil sulfate was supplied through the courtesy of Mr. H. C. Epley of the Department of Medical Research, Winthrop Laboratories, Menlo Park, Calif. 2. Page, F.: Treatment of Lupus Erythematosus with Mepacrine , Lancet 2:755-758 ( (Oct. 27) ) 1951.Crossref 3. Leeper, R. W., and Allende, M. F.: Antimalarials in the Treatment of Discoid Lupus Erythematosus , A. M. A. Arch. Dermat. 73:50-57 ( (Jan.) ) 1956.Crossref 4. Knox, J. M.; Lamb, J. H.; Shelmire, B., and Morgan, R. J.: Light Sensitive Eruptions Treated with Atabrine and Chloroquine , J. Invest. Dermat. 22:11-17 ( (Jan.) ) 1954.Crossref 5. Cahn, M. M.; Levy, E. J., Shaffer, B.: The Use of Chloroquine Diphosphate (Aralen) and Quinacrine (Atabrine) Hydrochloride in the Prevention of Polymorphous Light Eruptions , J. Invest. Dermat. 22:93-96 ( (Feb.) ) 1954. 6. Goldman, L.; in discussion on Stegmaier, O. C.: Chronic Porphyria (cases presented before Chicago Dermatological Society, Oct. 20, 1954) , A. M. A. Arch. Dermat. 71:415-516 ( (March) ) 1955.Crossref 7. Mullins, J. F.; Kirk, J. M., and Shapiro, E. M.: Chloroquine Treatment of Lupus Erythematosus , South. M. J. 48:732-736 ( (July) ) 1955.Crossref 8. Kierland, R. B., in discussion on Laymon, C. W.: Lupus Erythematosus (Systemic) (case presented before Minnesota Dermatological Society, April 1, 1955) , A. M. A. Arch. Dermat. 72:381-382 ( (Oct.) ) 1955. 9. The Schoch Letter (Medical Arts Building, Dallas, Texas) Sept., 1955, and Jan., 1956. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Plaquenil Sulfate in Treatment of Lupus Erythematosus and Light-Sensitivity Eruptions

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/plaquenil-sulfate-in-treatment-of-lupus-erythematosus-and-light-0agb48laxc
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1957 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5359
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1957.01550140025004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The value of antimalarials in the treatment of lupus erythematosus has been well established since Page's article on the use of quinacrine (mepacrine).1 A recent article by Leeper and Allende2 compared the use of quinacrine, chloroquine, and amodiaquin for this condition and indicated that the latter two were preferable. Also, light-sensitivity eruptions have been successfully treated and recurrences prevented with quinacrine and chloroquine.3,4 Another antimalarial preparation under investigation is Plaquenil sulfate (7-chloro-4-[4-N-ethyl-N-β-hydroxyethylamino-1-methylbutylamino]-quinoline). This drug has also been referred to as Win 1258 and is a synthesized stable colorless crystalline solid. It is supplied in tablets of 0.2 and 0.4 gm. It is a 4-aminoquinoline, differing from chloroquine diphosphate in that one of the terminal ethyl groups on the tertiary amino nitrogen is replaced by a hydroxyethyl group. Plaquenil sulfate has been mentioned by several investigators. Goldman5 felt it was ``certainly less toxic References 1. The Plaquenil sulfate was supplied through the courtesy of Mr. H. C. Epley of the Department of Medical Research, Winthrop Laboratories, Menlo Park, Calif. 2. Page, F.: Treatment of Lupus Erythematosus with Mepacrine , Lancet 2:755-758 ( (Oct. 27) ) 1951.Crossref 3. Leeper, R. W., and Allende, M. F.: Antimalarials in the Treatment of Discoid Lupus Erythematosus , A. M. A. Arch. Dermat. 73:50-57 ( (Jan.) ) 1956.Crossref 4. Knox, J. M.; Lamb, J. H.; Shelmire, B., and Morgan, R. J.: Light Sensitive Eruptions Treated with Atabrine and Chloroquine , J. Invest. Dermat. 22:11-17 ( (Jan.) ) 1954.Crossref 5. Cahn, M. M.; Levy, E. J., Shaffer, B.: The Use of Chloroquine Diphosphate (Aralen) and Quinacrine (Atabrine) Hydrochloride in the Prevention of Polymorphous Light Eruptions , J. Invest. Dermat. 22:93-96 ( (Feb.) ) 1954. 6. Goldman, L.; in discussion on Stegmaier, O. C.: Chronic Porphyria (cases presented before Chicago Dermatological Society, Oct. 20, 1954) , A. M. A. Arch. Dermat. 71:415-516 ( (March) ) 1955.Crossref 7. Mullins, J. F.; Kirk, J. M., and Shapiro, E. M.: Chloroquine Treatment of Lupus Erythematosus , South. M. J. 48:732-736 ( (July) ) 1955.Crossref 8. Kierland, R. B., in discussion on Laymon, C. W.: Lupus Erythematosus (Systemic) (case presented before Minnesota Dermatological Society, April 1, 1955) , A. M. A. Arch. Dermat. 72:381-382 ( (Oct.) ) 1955. 9. The Schoch Letter (Medical Arts Building, Dallas, Texas) Sept., 1955, and Jan., 1956.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1957

References