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Picture of the Month

Picture of the Month Abstract Denouement and Discussion Benign Neonatal Hemangiomatosis Manifestations Benign neonatal hemangiomatosis (BNH) consists of multiple, small, bright-red to purple, capillary hemangiomas that range in size from that of a pinhead to 20 mm in diameter. Only the skin is affected; there is no mucous membrane or visceral involvement. The hemangiomas usually are present at birth or appear during the first few weeks of life. They rapidly increase in size and number until approximately 3 weeks of age, at which time they begin to spontaneously regress. Involution is usually complete by the fourth month of life.The more common type of hemangiomas, such as strawberry hemangiomas, are easily differentiated from BNH. They are not as numerous and first appear as a white or reddish spot, a telangiectatic lesion surrounded by a pale halo, or a fully developed hemangioma. The hemangiomas References 1. Stillman AE, Hansen RC, Hallinan V, et al: Diffuse neonatal hemangiomatosis with severe gastrointestinal involvement . Clin Pediatr 1983;22:589-591.Crossref 2. Stern JK, Wolf JE, Jarret M: Benign neonatal hemangiomatosis . J Am Acad Dermatol 1981;4:442-445.Crossref 3. Holden KR, Alexander F: Diffuse neonatal hemangiomatosis . Pediatrics 1980;46:411-421. 4. Burman D, Mansell P, Warin R: Miliary hemangiomata in the newborn . Arch Dis Child 1967;42:193-197.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1986.02140190057025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Denouement and Discussion Benign Neonatal Hemangiomatosis Manifestations Benign neonatal hemangiomatosis (BNH) consists of multiple, small, bright-red to purple, capillary hemangiomas that range in size from that of a pinhead to 20 mm in diameter. Only the skin is affected; there is no mucous membrane or visceral involvement. The hemangiomas usually are present at birth or appear during the first few weeks of life. They rapidly increase in size and number until approximately 3 weeks of age, at which time they begin to spontaneously regress. Involution is usually complete by the fourth month of life.The more common type of hemangiomas, such as strawberry hemangiomas, are easily differentiated from BNH. They are not as numerous and first appear as a white or reddish spot, a telangiectatic lesion surrounded by a pale halo, or a fully developed hemangioma. The hemangiomas References 1. Stillman AE, Hansen RC, Hallinan V, et al: Diffuse neonatal hemangiomatosis with severe gastrointestinal involvement . Clin Pediatr 1983;22:589-591.Crossref 2. Stern JK, Wolf JE, Jarret M: Benign neonatal hemangiomatosis . J Am Acad Dermatol 1981;4:442-445.Crossref 3. Holden KR, Alexander F: Diffuse neonatal hemangiomatosis . Pediatrics 1980;46:411-421. 4. Burman D, Mansell P, Warin R: Miliary hemangiomata in the newborn . Arch Dis Child 1967;42:193-197.Crossref

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1986

References