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Picture of the Month

Picture of the Month Abstract Denouement and Discussion Trichobezoars Manifestations Trichobezoars are secondary to the ingestion of hair which then forms into a "hairball." Manifestations occur when the ball becomes larger and produces vague pain in the upper portion of the abdomen, tenderness in the epigastrium, intolerance to solid foods, and weight loss. Signs of obstruction may also be present. The majority of the patients are female and there is a higher incidence in children who are mentally retarded or emotionally disturbed. On physical examination the mass frequently can be palpated. It is easily confused with an enlarged, hard spleen but its mobility should differentiate it from the spleen. It may also be delineated on x-ray examination of the gastrointestinal tract. In most patients examination of the head will reveal bare patches from which the hair has been pulled. Short hair is unlikely to be caught in the stomach.Other types of bezoars include phytobezoar References 1. Mustard WT (ed): Pediatric Surgery . Chicago, Year Book Medical Publishers Inc, 1969, vol 2, pp 828-829. 2. Cohen NR, Striica A: The medical treatment of bezoars , Gastroint Endosc 14:144-145, 1968. 3. Gwinn JL, Barnes GR Jr.: Trichobezoar . Amer J Dis Child 114:311-312, 1967. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1972 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1972.02110090099012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Denouement and Discussion Trichobezoars Manifestations Trichobezoars are secondary to the ingestion of hair which then forms into a "hairball." Manifestations occur when the ball becomes larger and produces vague pain in the upper portion of the abdomen, tenderness in the epigastrium, intolerance to solid foods, and weight loss. Signs of obstruction may also be present. The majority of the patients are female and there is a higher incidence in children who are mentally retarded or emotionally disturbed. On physical examination the mass frequently can be palpated. It is easily confused with an enlarged, hard spleen but its mobility should differentiate it from the spleen. It may also be delineated on x-ray examination of the gastrointestinal tract. In most patients examination of the head will reveal bare patches from which the hair has been pulled. Short hair is unlikely to be caught in the stomach.Other types of bezoars include phytobezoar References 1. Mustard WT (ed): Pediatric Surgery . Chicago, Year Book Medical Publishers Inc, 1969, vol 2, pp 828-829. 2. Cohen NR, Striica A: The medical treatment of bezoars , Gastroint Endosc 14:144-145, 1968. 3. Gwinn JL, Barnes GR Jr.: Trichobezoar . Amer J Dis Child 114:311-312, 1967.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1972

References