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Picture of the Month

Picture of the Month Abstract Denouement and Discussion Cat-scratch Fever A skin pustule or papule resembling an insect bite may be present up to 30 days after the patient is scratched by a cat. Rarely, it develops after a dog or monkey bite or a scratch from a thorn or splinter. With careful scrutiny, the inoculation site can be detected in the majority of patients.Approximately two weeks (range, three to 50 days) after the scratch, regional lymphadenopathy develops in the epitrochlear, axillary, cervical, supraclavicular, submandibular, periauricular, or inguinal areas. The enlarged lymph nodes are painful and tender for one to three months. Most enlarged nodes subside spontaneously, but some suppurate, soften, and drain.Fever, malaise, headache, rash, and flulike symptoms are present in about one third of affected patients. Other clinical manifestations include Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome, neurologic symptoms, osteomyelitis, thrombocytopenia purpura, a specific type of pneumonia, and erythema nodosum. Laboratory tests are not References 1. Carithers HA: Oculoglandular disease of Parinaud: A manifestation of cat-scratch disease . AJDC 1978;132:1195-1200. 2. Margileth AM: Cat-scratch disease update . AJDC 1984;138:711-713. 3. Gerber MA, MacAuster TJ, Ballow M, et al: The aetiological agent of cat scratch disease . Lancet 1985;1:1236-1239.Crossref 4. Carithers HA: Cat-scratch disease: An overview based on a study of 1,200 patients . AJDC 1985;139:1124-1133. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1986.02140150059035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Denouement and Discussion Cat-scratch Fever A skin pustule or papule resembling an insect bite may be present up to 30 days after the patient is scratched by a cat. Rarely, it develops after a dog or monkey bite or a scratch from a thorn or splinter. With careful scrutiny, the inoculation site can be detected in the majority of patients.Approximately two weeks (range, three to 50 days) after the scratch, regional lymphadenopathy develops in the epitrochlear, axillary, cervical, supraclavicular, submandibular, periauricular, or inguinal areas. The enlarged lymph nodes are painful and tender for one to three months. Most enlarged nodes subside spontaneously, but some suppurate, soften, and drain.Fever, malaise, headache, rash, and flulike symptoms are present in about one third of affected patients. Other clinical manifestations include Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome, neurologic symptoms, osteomyelitis, thrombocytopenia purpura, a specific type of pneumonia, and erythema nodosum. Laboratory tests are not References 1. Carithers HA: Oculoglandular disease of Parinaud: A manifestation of cat-scratch disease . AJDC 1978;132:1195-1200. 2. Margileth AM: Cat-scratch disease update . AJDC 1984;138:711-713. 3. Gerber MA, MacAuster TJ, Ballow M, et al: The aetiological agent of cat scratch disease . Lancet 1985;1:1236-1239.Crossref 4. Carithers HA: Cat-scratch disease: An overview based on a study of 1,200 patients . AJDC 1985;139:1124-1133.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1986

References