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PHYSIOLOGY OF AQUEOUS IN COMPLETELY IRIDECTOMIZED EYES

PHYSIOLOGY OF AQUEOUS IN COMPLETELY IRIDECTOMIZED EYES Abstract It has been established that the aqueous humor contains less urea than the circulating blood. Urea should be present in equal amounts in aqueous and blood if the aqueous is formed by dialysis alone, since urea is a crystalloid and a nonelectrolyte. It is, however, possible that after the aqueous is formed other processes alter its chemical composition so that it can no longer be recognized as a dialysate. In an attempt to explain this discrepancy a number of factors were explored and reported in a previous paper.1 As a result of those studies the low urea content of aqueous was attributed to a lack of permeability of the blood-aqueous barrier to urea. Under normal conditions the membrane separating aqueous from blood does not allow urea to pass through it readily, so that the concentration is always about 20 per cent less in aqueous than in blood. This is References 1. Moore, E.; Scheie, H. G., and Adler, F. H.: Chemical Equilibrium Between Blood and Aqueous Humor , Arch. Ophth. 27:317 ( (Feb.) ) 1942.Crossref 2. Friedenwald, J. S., and Pierce, H. F.: Circulation of the Aqueous: Reabsorption of Crystalloids , Arch. Ophth. 10:449 ( (Oct.) ) 1933.Crossref 3. Friedenwald, J. S.: Perspectives in Glaucoma Research , Arch. Ophth. 24:107 ( (July) ) 1940.Crossref 4. Looney, J. M., and Walsh, A. I.: Determination of Spinal Fluid Protein with Photoelectric Colorimeter , J. Biol. Chem. 127:117, 1939 5. Determination of Globulin and Albumin in Blood Serum by Photoelectric Colorimeter , Looney J. Biol. Chem. 130:635, 1939. 6. Adler, F. H.: Is Aqueous Humor a Dialysate? Arch. Ophth. 10:11 ( (July) ) 1933.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

PHYSIOLOGY OF AQUEOUS IN COMPLETELY IRIDECTOMIZED EYES

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1943 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1943.00880190088008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract It has been established that the aqueous humor contains less urea than the circulating blood. Urea should be present in equal amounts in aqueous and blood if the aqueous is formed by dialysis alone, since urea is a crystalloid and a nonelectrolyte. It is, however, possible that after the aqueous is formed other processes alter its chemical composition so that it can no longer be recognized as a dialysate. In an attempt to explain this discrepancy a number of factors were explored and reported in a previous paper.1 As a result of those studies the low urea content of aqueous was attributed to a lack of permeability of the blood-aqueous barrier to urea. Under normal conditions the membrane separating aqueous from blood does not allow urea to pass through it readily, so that the concentration is always about 20 per cent less in aqueous than in blood. This is References 1. Moore, E.; Scheie, H. G., and Adler, F. H.: Chemical Equilibrium Between Blood and Aqueous Humor , Arch. Ophth. 27:317 ( (Feb.) ) 1942.Crossref 2. Friedenwald, J. S., and Pierce, H. F.: Circulation of the Aqueous: Reabsorption of Crystalloids , Arch. Ophth. 10:449 ( (Oct.) ) 1933.Crossref 3. Friedenwald, J. S.: Perspectives in Glaucoma Research , Arch. Ophth. 24:107 ( (July) ) 1940.Crossref 4. Looney, J. M., and Walsh, A. I.: Determination of Spinal Fluid Protein with Photoelectric Colorimeter , J. Biol. Chem. 127:117, 1939 5. Determination of Globulin and Albumin in Blood Serum by Photoelectric Colorimeter , Looney J. Biol. Chem. 130:635, 1939. 6. Adler, F. H.: Is Aqueous Humor a Dialysate? Arch. Ophth. 10:11 ( (July) ) 1933.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1943

References

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