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Physiologic Studies in Atopic Dermatitis (Disseminated Neurodermatitis): II. The Effect of Denervation on the Delayed Blanch Phenomenon

Physiologic Studies in Atopic Dermatitis (Disseminated Neurodermatitis): II. The Effect of... Abstract Introduction In a previous communication1 the responses of the blood vessels and eccrine sweat glands of the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis to the intradermal injection of epinephrine and acetylcholine was described. It was found that an intradermal injection of epinephrine (1:10,000 and 1:100,000) produced a normal response in patients with atopic dermatitis. However, when acetylcholine (1,10,000 and 1:100,000) was injected intradermally into the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis, a "delayed blanch phenomenon" of vasoconstriction occurred rather than the normal response of vasodilatation. It was postulated that the "delayed blanch phenomenon" was the result of the direct action of a vasoconstrictor substance on the blood vessels of the skin. It was further suggested that this hypothetical vasoconstrictor substance is either (1) acetylcholine itself producing a constrictor rather than the usual vasodilator response or (2) some other vasoconstricting substance which is released after acetylcholine References 1. Lobitz, W. C., Jr., and Campbell, C. J.: Physiologic Studies in Atopic Dermatitis (Disseminated Neurodermatitis): 1. Local Cutaneous Response to Intradermally Injected Acetylcholine and Epinephrine , A. M. A. Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 67:575, 1953. 2. Burn, J. H.: Relation of Motor and Inhibitor Effects of Local Hormones , Physiol. Rev. 30:177, 1950. 3. Illig, L.: Die Reaktion der Haut des Neurodermitikers auf zwei nikotinsäureesterhaltige Reizstoffe , Dermat. Wchnschr. 126:753, 1952. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Physiologic Studies in Atopic Dermatitis (Disseminated Neurodermatitis): II. The Effect of Denervation on the Delayed Blanch Phenomenon

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1957 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5359
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1957.01550140072011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Introduction In a previous communication1 the responses of the blood vessels and eccrine sweat glands of the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis to the intradermal injection of epinephrine and acetylcholine was described. It was found that an intradermal injection of epinephrine (1:10,000 and 1:100,000) produced a normal response in patients with atopic dermatitis. However, when acetylcholine (1,10,000 and 1:100,000) was injected intradermally into the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis, a "delayed blanch phenomenon" of vasoconstriction occurred rather than the normal response of vasodilatation. It was postulated that the "delayed blanch phenomenon" was the result of the direct action of a vasoconstrictor substance on the blood vessels of the skin. It was further suggested that this hypothetical vasoconstrictor substance is either (1) acetylcholine itself producing a constrictor rather than the usual vasodilator response or (2) some other vasoconstricting substance which is released after acetylcholine References 1. Lobitz, W. C., Jr., and Campbell, C. J.: Physiologic Studies in Atopic Dermatitis (Disseminated Neurodermatitis): 1. Local Cutaneous Response to Intradermally Injected Acetylcholine and Epinephrine , A. M. A. Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 67:575, 1953. 2. Burn, J. H.: Relation of Motor and Inhibitor Effects of Local Hormones , Physiol. Rev. 30:177, 1950. 3. Illig, L.: Die Reaktion der Haut des Neurodermitikers auf zwei nikotinsäureesterhaltige Reizstoffe , Dermat. Wchnschr. 126:753, 1952.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1957

References