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PHYSICAL DEFECTS IN PUPILS.

PHYSICAL DEFECTS IN PUPILS. I will take up that phase of the subject which deals with the problem of how best to preserve the eyesight of school children, a theme which is pregnant with importance. The prosecution of this subject opens up a wide field, involving not only those elements or conditions, which primarily and particularly bear upon ocular hygiene, such as print, lighting, etc., but also bear upon those circumstances obtaining during the school life of the child, which can either directly or indirectly affect the preservation or degeneration of his eyesight. Such consideration will lead us into a discussion of architecture, buildings, location, window space, lighting (natural and artificial), seats, desks, walls, blackboards, maps, charts, paper, slates, printed matter, writing, etc. The importance of this topic may be imagined, when we consider that James H. Blodgett, in 1890, estimated that over fourteen million children were in attendance in the different schools and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

PHYSICAL DEFECTS IN PUPILS.

JAMA , Volume XXX (23) – Jun 4, 1898

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1898 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1898.72440750024002h
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I will take up that phase of the subject which deals with the problem of how best to preserve the eyesight of school children, a theme which is pregnant with importance. The prosecution of this subject opens up a wide field, involving not only those elements or conditions, which primarily and particularly bear upon ocular hygiene, such as print, lighting, etc., but also bear upon those circumstances obtaining during the school life of the child, which can either directly or indirectly affect the preservation or degeneration of his eyesight. Such consideration will lead us into a discussion of architecture, buildings, location, window space, lighting (natural and artificial), seats, desks, walls, blackboards, maps, charts, paper, slates, printed matter, writing, etc. The importance of this topic may be imagined, when we consider that James H. Blodgett, in 1890, estimated that over fourteen million children were in attendance in the different schools and

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 4, 1898

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