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Phototoxic Textile Dermatitis (Bikini Dermatitis)

Phototoxic Textile Dermatitis (Bikini Dermatitis) Abstract • Phototoxic textile dermatitis with subsequent hyperpigmentation developed in two patients after they wore bikini bathing suits. After extraction of the dye from the bathing suits, 15 fractions could be visualized by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. Two of these fractions are found in Disperse Blue 35, an anthraquinone dye known to give rise to occupational phototoxic dermatitis, but which, to our knowledge, has never been reported to cause dermatitis in consumers. One of the two fractions was also found to cause phototoxic reactions in normal subjects. (Arch Dermatol 112:1445-1447, 1976) References 1. Gardiner JS, Dickson A, Macleod AL: The investigation of photocontact dermatitis in a dye manufacturing process . Br J Dermatol 86:264-271, 1972.Crossref 2. Osmundsen PE: Pigmented contact dermatitis . Br J Dermatol 83:296-301, 1970.Crossref 3. Cronin E: Studies in contact dermatitis: XVIII. Dyes in clothing . Trans St Johns Hosp Dermatol Soc 54:156-164, 1968. 4. Sim-Davies D: Studies in contact dermatitis: XXIV. Dyes in trousers . Trans St Johns Hosp Dermatol Soc 58:251-260, 1972. 5. Harber LC, Harris H, Leider M, et al: Berloque dermatitis: A technique for its deliberate reproduction . Arch Dermatol 90:572-576, 1964.Crossref 6. Maibach HI, Marzulli FN: Perfume phototoxicity . J Soc Cosmetics Chem 21:695-715, 1970. 7. Kligman AM, Breit R: The identification of phototoxic drugs by human assay . J Invest Dermatol 51:90-99, 1968.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Phototoxic Textile Dermatitis (Bikini Dermatitis)

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 112 (10) – Oct 1, 1976

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1976 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1976.01630340063018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • Phototoxic textile dermatitis with subsequent hyperpigmentation developed in two patients after they wore bikini bathing suits. After extraction of the dye from the bathing suits, 15 fractions could be visualized by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography. Two of these fractions are found in Disperse Blue 35, an anthraquinone dye known to give rise to occupational phototoxic dermatitis, but which, to our knowledge, has never been reported to cause dermatitis in consumers. One of the two fractions was also found to cause phototoxic reactions in normal subjects. (Arch Dermatol 112:1445-1447, 1976) References 1. Gardiner JS, Dickson A, Macleod AL: The investigation of photocontact dermatitis in a dye manufacturing process . Br J Dermatol 86:264-271, 1972.Crossref 2. Osmundsen PE: Pigmented contact dermatitis . Br J Dermatol 83:296-301, 1970.Crossref 3. Cronin E: Studies in contact dermatitis: XVIII. Dyes in clothing . Trans St Johns Hosp Dermatol Soc 54:156-164, 1968. 4. Sim-Davies D: Studies in contact dermatitis: XXIV. Dyes in trousers . Trans St Johns Hosp Dermatol Soc 58:251-260, 1972. 5. Harber LC, Harris H, Leider M, et al: Berloque dermatitis: A technique for its deliberate reproduction . Arch Dermatol 90:572-576, 1964.Crossref 6. Maibach HI, Marzulli FN: Perfume phototoxicity . J Soc Cosmetics Chem 21:695-715, 1970. 7. Kligman AM, Breit R: The identification of phototoxic drugs by human assay . J Invest Dermatol 51:90-99, 1968.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1976

References