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PERFORATION OF THE STOMACH IN THE NEWBORN

PERFORATION OF THE STOMACH IN THE NEWBORN PERFORATION stomach in the newborn infant is rare. It is believed that the cases here reported constitute the 21st and 22d instances of such perforation. One of them is the second case of pyloric atresia complicated by perforation. In a comprehensive review of the literature in 1941, Bird, Limper, and Mayer1 found 245 recorded cases of peptic ulcer in children 15 years of age and under. Of these, 42 were in infants 0 to 14 days of age, with a ratio of duodenal to gastric ulcers of about two to one. It was pointed out that in such ulcers recognized in the early days or months of life, serious bleeding or perforation or both are characteristic. During later childhood, however, the incidence of pyloric stenosis and perforation increases, with a decrease in the incidence of serious hemorrhage. REPORT OF CASES Case 1.—T. W., a 3-day-old white boy baby, was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

PERFORATION OF THE STOMACH IN THE NEWBORN

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1953 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1953.02050070054006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PERFORATION stomach in the newborn infant is rare. It is believed that the cases here reported constitute the 21st and 22d instances of such perforation. One of them is the second case of pyloric atresia complicated by perforation. In a comprehensive review of the literature in 1941, Bird, Limper, and Mayer1 found 245 recorded cases of peptic ulcer in children 15 years of age and under. Of these, 42 were in infants 0 to 14 days of age, with a ratio of duodenal to gastric ulcers of about two to one. It was pointed out that in such ulcers recognized in the early days or months of life, serious bleeding or perforation or both are characteristic. During later childhood, however, the incidence of pyloric stenosis and perforation increases, with a decrease in the incidence of serious hemorrhage. REPORT OF CASES Case 1.—T. W., a 3-day-old white boy baby, was

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1953

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