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Pediculosis Capitis

Pediculosis Capitis To the Editor.— The statement by Orkin et al (236:1136, 1976) regarding pediculosis capitis is in direct conflict with the clinical and epidemiologic picture of head lice as seen in the Dade County Department of Public Health during the past three years. The picture seen in Miami has been one of frequent repeated school-based outbreaks occurring primarily among elementary school children, with relatively fewer cases among the preschoolers. The statement, "As soon as children attend school, the frequency decreases rapidly in males but continues in females" is not substantiated in the article or in our clinical experience. Extensive epidemiologic studies conducted by local health department staff have demonstrated almost 100% infection rates among siblings of children found to have head lice. In our experience, the continuation of head lice among family members is generally caused by the failure to treat all family members at the time the initial case is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Pediculosis Capitis

JAMA , Volume 237 (6) – Feb 7, 1977

Pediculosis Capitis

Abstract



To the Editor.—
The statement by Orkin et al (236:1136, 1976) regarding pediculosis capitis is in direct conflict with the clinical and epidemiologic picture of head lice as seen in the Dade County Department of Public Health during the past three years.
The picture seen in Miami has been one of frequent repeated school-based outbreaks occurring primarily among elementary school children, with relatively fewer cases among the preschoolers. The statement, "As soon as children...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1977 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1977.03270330020005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor.— The statement by Orkin et al (236:1136, 1976) regarding pediculosis capitis is in direct conflict with the clinical and epidemiologic picture of head lice as seen in the Dade County Department of Public Health during the past three years. The picture seen in Miami has been one of frequent repeated school-based outbreaks occurring primarily among elementary school children, with relatively fewer cases among the preschoolers. The statement, "As soon as children attend school, the frequency decreases rapidly in males but continues in females" is not substantiated in the article or in our clinical experience. Extensive epidemiologic studies conducted by local health department staff have demonstrated almost 100% infection rates among siblings of children found to have head lice. In our experience, the continuation of head lice among family members is generally caused by the failure to treat all family members at the time the initial case is

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 7, 1977

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