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Patients’ Views of Shared Decision-making and Decisional Conflict in Otolaryngologic Surgery During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Patients’ Views of Shared Decision-making and Decisional Conflict in Otolaryngologic Surgery... Key PointsQuestionWhat is the prevalence of decisional conflict for surgical patients during the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic? FindingsIn this cross-sectional survey study of 182 patients scheduled for otolaryngologic surgery during the pandemic, non-White participants without college education were 10 times more likely to screen positive for decisional conflict compared with college-educated White participants. Concerns about intraoperative and postoperative processes were more prominent than COVID-19 concerns. MeaningThe results of this survey study suggest the need for health care professionals to converse with patients about patient values, beliefs, and specific concerns about treatment; future studies to elucidate racial health care inequities are warranted. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery American Medical Association

Patients’ Views of Shared Decision-making and Decisional Conflict in Otolaryngologic Surgery During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2021 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6181
eISSN
2168-619X
DOI
10.1001/jamaoto.2021.2230
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Key PointsQuestionWhat is the prevalence of decisional conflict for surgical patients during the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic? FindingsIn this cross-sectional survey study of 182 patients scheduled for otolaryngologic surgery during the pandemic, non-White participants without college education were 10 times more likely to screen positive for decisional conflict compared with college-educated White participants. Concerns about intraoperative and postoperative processes were more prominent than COVID-19 concerns. MeaningThe results of this survey study suggest the need for health care professionals to converse with patients about patient values, beliefs, and specific concerns about treatment; future studies to elucidate racial health care inequities are warranted.

Journal

JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 9, 2021

References