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Pathology and Audiology of Middle-Ear Lesions

Pathology and Audiology of Middle-Ear Lesions Abstract Ten years have passed since the end of World War II, ten years since the first largescale clinical utilization of penicillin. Fundamental changes in otolaryngology occurred in this decade, changes which seemed menacing to the very existence of otology and which, therefore, lead some otological Cassandras to speak of the "dying profession." More recently the prophets of doom have fewer and fewer followers. On the contrary, a more optimistic outlook seems to prevail. Increasing interest in and enhanced therapeutic activity against hearing losses due to conduction-type defects have become evident. New surgical methods are being developed and new diagnostic criteria are being designed for the purpose of properly selecting and assaying the tympanic pathology. In the past, the treatment of conduction lesions after the inflammatory phase had burned out was neglected by otologists. Scarification and adhesions in the middle ear appeared to be unalterable, unassailable, and even unpreventible. The interest References 1. Gellé: Tr. Internat. M. Cong. 3:370, 1881. 2. Pohlman, M. E.: Ann. Otol. Rhin. & Laryng. 57:483, 1948. 3. Thullen, A.: Arch. Ohren- Nasen- u. Kehlkopfh. 162:126, 1952. 4. Zoellner, F.: Arch. Ohren- Nasen- u. Kehlkopfh. 159:350, 1951. 5. Arch. Ohren- Nasen- u. Kehlkopfh. 161:414, 1952. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Pathology and Audiology of Middle-Ear Lesions

A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 63 (2) – Feb 1, 1956

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6894
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1956.03830080063012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Ten years have passed since the end of World War II, ten years since the first largescale clinical utilization of penicillin. Fundamental changes in otolaryngology occurred in this decade, changes which seemed menacing to the very existence of otology and which, therefore, lead some otological Cassandras to speak of the "dying profession." More recently the prophets of doom have fewer and fewer followers. On the contrary, a more optimistic outlook seems to prevail. Increasing interest in and enhanced therapeutic activity against hearing losses due to conduction-type defects have become evident. New surgical methods are being developed and new diagnostic criteria are being designed for the purpose of properly selecting and assaying the tympanic pathology. In the past, the treatment of conduction lesions after the inflammatory phase had burned out was neglected by otologists. Scarification and adhesions in the middle ear appeared to be unalterable, unassailable, and even unpreventible. The interest References 1. Gellé: Tr. Internat. M. Cong. 3:370, 1881. 2. Pohlman, M. E.: Ann. Otol. Rhin. & Laryng. 57:483, 1948. 3. Thullen, A.: Arch. Ohren- Nasen- u. Kehlkopfh. 162:126, 1952. 4. Zoellner, F.: Arch. Ohren- Nasen- u. Kehlkopfh. 159:350, 1951. 5. Arch. Ohren- Nasen- u. Kehlkopfh. 161:414, 1952.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1956

References