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Parapsoriasis: A Resistant Maculo-PAPULAR Scaly Erythodermia, With A Report of Three Cases. . . .

Parapsoriasis: A Resistant Maculo-PAPULAR Scaly Erythodermia, With A Report of Three Cases. . . . THE JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS DISEASES VOL. XXVII FEBRUARY, 1909 NO. 2 By WILLIAM THOMAS CORLETT, M. D.break/ Professor of Dermatology and Syphilology, and OSCAR T. SCHULTZ, M. D.break/Lecturer on Pathology and Protozoology, Western Reserve University, Cleveland. As in other types of cutaneous disease, cases of anomalous or apparently hybrid scaly eruptions have been from time to time encountered. Lailler in 1871 observed a scaly eruption which he regarded as pityriasis rubra, and of which Baretta made a model for the museum of the Hôpital St. Louis. J Cutan Dis. 1909;27(2):49-71. Editor's Comment On August 5, 1889, the Hôpital Saint-Louis in Paris opened its doors to the First International Congress of Dermatology and Syphilology. By their mere presence, the 210 attendees representing 29 countries paid homage to French dermatology. As the conferees streamed into the Hôpital's new specially built lecture hall, they were literally ushered into a magical new mode of medical instruction. Surrounding them were floor-to-ceiling glass cabinets displaying hundreds of lifelike wax models of skin diseases. When the Congress adjourned 6 days later, these renowned doctors returned home to begin their own collections of wax models, often by purchasing them from an established mouler like Baretta. The collaboration of Dr Charles Lailler and Jules Pierre François Baretta began when Lailler saw Baretta's incredibly realistic papier-mâché fruits. Baretta, who instantly absorbed the laborious and esoteric skills needed by a mouler, produced moulages for Lailler's private collection. In the late 1860s, Lailler had Baretta officially appointed mouler to the Hôpital and redesigned the museum space to emphasize both the artistry and didactic value of Baretta's masterpieces. Though earlier moulers such as Joseph Towne of Guy's Hospital, London, might have temporal pride of place over Baretta, no one before or since has demonstrated such mastery of reproducing dermatologic diseases in the moulage medium, and no venue has had a greater impact on the world of moulage than the Saint-Louis pathology museum. Moulage advanced dermatology, and dermatology provided the greatest outlet for the mouler. When doctors encountered the masterful moulages displayed by their dermatologic brethren, and interested surgeons came to dermatology begging for a chance to borrow their mouler, proud dermatologists were the envy of others. Moulages were expensive to make, difficult to maintain, bulky to store, and too fragile for frequent handling. Color photography replaced moulage. The moulers were also to blame for the collapse of their art. They were as protective of their procedures and concoctions as any medieval alchemist, few allowed any observers to enter their workshops, and even fewer potential apprentices were willing or capable of mastering the intricacy, minutia, tedium, and arcana necessary to become a mouler. Nor could the moulage technique itself be modernized: despite many efforts to develop synthetic moulages, nothing ever came close to the plasticity and modeling capabilities of the original pure honeybee wax. The destruction of so many European collections during World War II and the economic deprivations of the postwar reconstruction relegated moulage to a quaint historical artifact. Thomas Schnalke's reason for the disappearance of moulages is Schaulust, a mixture of curiosity and repulsion. The moulages so successfully reproduced the patient's skin disease that the observer experienced revulsion caused by the disease and identified with the patient. In simpler terms, it is difficult to intensely examine the moulages because they are so true-to-life that we irrationally fear that the models are silently, accusingly, staring straight back at us. The framework for this piece is Schnalke T. Diseases in Wax: The History of the Medical Moulage. Spatschek K, trans. Berlin, Germany: Quintessence Publishing Co; 1995. Though nothing can compare with face-to-face viewing of a moulage, given their scarcity and the difficulty of even finding books about the subject, interested readers may want to visit the Hôpital Saint-Louis Web site at http://www.bium.univ-paris5.fr/sfhd/musee/moulages.htm. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Parapsoriasis: A Resistant Maculo-PAPULAR Scaly Erythodermia, With A Report of Three Cases. . . .

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 145 (2) – Feb 1, 2009

Parapsoriasis: A Resistant Maculo-PAPULAR Scaly Erythodermia, With A Report of Three Cases. . . .

Abstract

THE JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS DISEASES VOL. XXVII FEBRUARY, 1909 NO. 2 By WILLIAM THOMAS CORLETT, M. D.break/ Professor of Dermatology and Syphilology, and OSCAR T. SCHULTZ, M. D.break/Lecturer on Pathology and Protozoology, Western Reserve University, Cleveland. As in other types of cutaneous disease, cases of anomalous or apparently hybrid scaly eruptions have been from time to time encountered. Lailler in 1871 observed a scaly eruption which he regarded as pityriasis rubra, and of which Baretta...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archdermatol.2008.555
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS DISEASES VOL. XXVII FEBRUARY, 1909 NO. 2 By WILLIAM THOMAS CORLETT, M. D.break/ Professor of Dermatology and Syphilology, and OSCAR T. SCHULTZ, M. D.break/Lecturer on Pathology and Protozoology, Western Reserve University, Cleveland. As in other types of cutaneous disease, cases of anomalous or apparently hybrid scaly eruptions have been from time to time encountered. Lailler in 1871 observed a scaly eruption which he regarded as pityriasis rubra, and of which Baretta made a model for the museum of the Hôpital St. Louis. J Cutan Dis. 1909;27(2):49-71. Editor's Comment On August 5, 1889, the Hôpital Saint-Louis in Paris opened its doors to the First International Congress of Dermatology and Syphilology. By their mere presence, the 210 attendees representing 29 countries paid homage to French dermatology. As the conferees streamed into the Hôpital's new specially built lecture hall, they were literally ushered into a magical new mode of medical instruction. Surrounding them were floor-to-ceiling glass cabinets displaying hundreds of lifelike wax models of skin diseases. When the Congress adjourned 6 days later, these renowned doctors returned home to begin their own collections of wax models, often by purchasing them from an established mouler like Baretta. The collaboration of Dr Charles Lailler and Jules Pierre François Baretta began when Lailler saw Baretta's incredibly realistic papier-mâché fruits. Baretta, who instantly absorbed the laborious and esoteric skills needed by a mouler, produced moulages for Lailler's private collection. In the late 1860s, Lailler had Baretta officially appointed mouler to the Hôpital and redesigned the museum space to emphasize both the artistry and didactic value of Baretta's masterpieces. Though earlier moulers such as Joseph Towne of Guy's Hospital, London, might have temporal pride of place over Baretta, no one before or since has demonstrated such mastery of reproducing dermatologic diseases in the moulage medium, and no venue has had a greater impact on the world of moulage than the Saint-Louis pathology museum. Moulage advanced dermatology, and dermatology provided the greatest outlet for the mouler. When doctors encountered the masterful moulages displayed by their dermatologic brethren, and interested surgeons came to dermatology begging for a chance to borrow their mouler, proud dermatologists were the envy of others. Moulages were expensive to make, difficult to maintain, bulky to store, and too fragile for frequent handling. Color photography replaced moulage. The moulers were also to blame for the collapse of their art. They were as protective of their procedures and concoctions as any medieval alchemist, few allowed any observers to enter their workshops, and even fewer potential apprentices were willing or capable of mastering the intricacy, minutia, tedium, and arcana necessary to become a mouler. Nor could the moulage technique itself be modernized: despite many efforts to develop synthetic moulages, nothing ever came close to the plasticity and modeling capabilities of the original pure honeybee wax. The destruction of so many European collections during World War II and the economic deprivations of the postwar reconstruction relegated moulage to a quaint historical artifact. Thomas Schnalke's reason for the disappearance of moulages is Schaulust, a mixture of curiosity and repulsion. The moulages so successfully reproduced the patient's skin disease that the observer experienced revulsion caused by the disease and identified with the patient. In simpler terms, it is difficult to intensely examine the moulages because they are so true-to-life that we irrationally fear that the models are silently, accusingly, staring straight back at us. The framework for this piece is Schnalke T. Diseases in Wax: The History of the Medical Moulage. Spatschek K, trans. Berlin, Germany: Quintessence Publishing Co; 1995. Though nothing can compare with face-to-face viewing of a moulage, given their scarcity and the difficulty of even finding books about the subject, interested readers may want to visit the Hôpital Saint-Louis Web site at http://www.bium.univ-paris5.fr/sfhd/musee/moulages.htm.

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 2009

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