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OXYGEN TOXICITY

OXYGEN TOXICITY The effects produced by breathing high concentrations of oxygen for prolonged periods of time have been studied intensively by many investigators in a variety of animals including frogs, turtles, pigeons, mice, rats, guinea pigs, cats, dogs and monkeys.1 Practically all of these investigators have reported the occurrence of irritation, congestion and edema of the lungs and even death following long exposures. Because of the recent introduction and widespread use of apparatus designed to deliver 100 per cent oxygen it is highly important that similar well controlled experiments be done on man to determine the limits for safe oxygen usage in therapy and in aviation. Satisfactory experiments of this type have not yet been performed. Behnke2 reported that healthy men between the ages of 20 and 40 are unable to breathe 99 per cent oxygen for periods in excess of seven hours because of nausea, dyspnea and substernal soreness; complete http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1945 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1945.02860270012004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The effects produced by breathing high concentrations of oxygen for prolonged periods of time have been studied intensively by many investigators in a variety of animals including frogs, turtles, pigeons, mice, rats, guinea pigs, cats, dogs and monkeys.1 Practically all of these investigators have reported the occurrence of irritation, congestion and edema of the lungs and even death following long exposures. Because of the recent introduction and widespread use of apparatus designed to deliver 100 per cent oxygen it is highly important that similar well controlled experiments be done on man to determine the limits for safe oxygen usage in therapy and in aviation. Satisfactory experiments of this type have not yet been performed. Behnke2 reported that healthy men between the ages of 20 and 40 are unable to breathe 99 per cent oxygen for periods in excess of seven hours because of nausea, dyspnea and substernal soreness; complete

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 7, 1945

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