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OXYGEN IN HIGH CONCENTRATIONS FOR RELIEF OF PAIN

OXYGEN IN HIGH CONCENTRATIONS FOR RELIEF OF PAIN There are two immediate objectives in the treatment of patients with acute coronary thrombosis, namely the support of the circulation and the relief of pain. The beneficial effects of oxygen administration in sustaining cardiorespiratory function, especially when significant degrees of shock or pulmonary edema exist, are well known. It is not widely recognized, however, that the inhalation of oxygen in high concentrations is effective in alleviating the pain associated with coronary thrombosis and angina pectoris. The pain associated with coronary thrombosis is notoriously variable in intensity. Its severity depends on the size of the coronary artery occluded, the speed of occlusion, the adequacy of coronary arterial anastomoses, the activity to which the myocardium is subjected, the sensitivity of the patient to pain, and other factors. Pain may be entirely absent1 or so mild that the underlying pathologic state is overlooked. In the vast majority of instances it is adequately http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

OXYGEN IN HIGH CONCENTRATIONS FOR RELIEF OF PAIN

JAMA , Volume 114 (16) – Apr 20, 1940

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1940 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1940.02810160014003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There are two immediate objectives in the treatment of patients with acute coronary thrombosis, namely the support of the circulation and the relief of pain. The beneficial effects of oxygen administration in sustaining cardiorespiratory function, especially when significant degrees of shock or pulmonary edema exist, are well known. It is not widely recognized, however, that the inhalation of oxygen in high concentrations is effective in alleviating the pain associated with coronary thrombosis and angina pectoris. The pain associated with coronary thrombosis is notoriously variable in intensity. Its severity depends on the size of the coronary artery occluded, the speed of occlusion, the adequacy of coronary arterial anastomoses, the activity to which the myocardium is subjected, the sensitivity of the patient to pain, and other factors. Pain may be entirely absent1 or so mild that the underlying pathologic state is overlooked. In the vast majority of instances it is adequately

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 20, 1940

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