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OVARIAN HILUS CELL (LEYDIG CELL) HYPERPLASIA ASSOCIATED WITH MASCULINIZATION

OVARIAN HILUS CELL (LEYDIG CELL) HYPERPLASIA ASSOCIATED WITH MASCULINIZATION Abstract OVARIAN tumors which are known to produce masculinization have usually been classified as arrhenoblastomas of the ovary, adrenal-like tumors of the ovary, and luteomas. The relationship of these tumors to each other, especially as regards histogenesis, morphology, and endocrine function, is a matter of continuing discussion, but these relationships remain unsettled. Teilum1 has emphasized the need for an improved histogenetic and morphologic classification of these and other functioning ovarian neoplasms. Another ovarian lesion associated with virilization, namely, hyperplasia or tumor of ovarian hilus cells, has recently been studied by Sternberg2 and discussed by Schiller.3 The ovarian hilus cells have been called sympathicotropic cells, ovarian Leydig cells, ovarian interstitial cells, and extraglandular Leydig cells; they are morphologically indistinguishable from testicular interstitial cells of Leydig (which produce androgen in the male) and are considered to be a possible source of ovarian androgen.2 Cases of tumor of ovarian hilus cells have been reported References 1. Teilum, G.: Estrogen-Producing Sertoli Cell Tumors (Androblastoma Tubulare Lipoides) of the Human Testis and Ovary: Homologous Ovarian and Testicular Tumors, III. , J. Clin. Endocrinol. 9:301-318 ( (April) ) 1949.Crossref 2. Sternberg, W. H.: The Morphology, Androgenic Function, Hyperplasia, and Tumors of the Human Ovarian Hilus Cells , Am. J. Path. 25:493-521 ( (May) ) 1949. 3. Schiller, W.: Embryology and Development of the Female Reproductive Tract, in Progress in Gynecology , edited by J. V. Meigs and S. H. Sturgis, New York, Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1950, Vol. 2, p. 27. 4. Berger, L.: Tumeur des cellules sympathicotropes de l'ovaire avec virilisation , Rev. canad. biol. 1:539-566 ( (June) ) 1942. 5. Waugh, D.; Venning, E. H., and McEachern, D.: Sympathicotropic (Leydig) Cell Tumor of Ovary with Virilism: Report of a Case , J. Clin. Endocrinol. 9:486-496 ( (June) ) 1949.Crossref 6. Sachs, B. A., and Spiro, D.: Leydig (Sympathicotropic) Cell Tumor of Ovary: Report of a Case with Virilism, Including Postmortem Findings , J. Clin. Endocrinol. 11:878-889 ( (Aug) .) 1951.Crossref 7. Dr. Gordon R. Hennigar described the autopsy material. 8. Young, W. R.: Association of Masculinizing Tumor of the Ovary and Pregnancy , Illinois M. J. 100:263-265 ( (Oct.) ) 1951. 9. Sternberg, W. H.: Personal communication to the authors. 10. Sternberg.2 11. Berger.4 12. Waugh.5 13. Sternberg.2 14. Waugh.5 15. Sachs.6 16. These are urinary formaldehydogenic corticosteroids. In this laboratory the values for normal adults are 0.3 to 1.0 mg. per 24 hours. 17. Mason, H. L., and Engstrom, W. M.: The 17-Ketosteroids: Their Origin, Determination and Significance , Physiol. Rev. 30:321-374 ( (July) ) 1950. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

OVARIAN HILUS CELL (LEYDIG CELL) HYPERPLASIA ASSOCIATED WITH MASCULINIZATION

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1953 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0888-2479
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1953.00240170101007
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract OVARIAN tumors which are known to produce masculinization have usually been classified as arrhenoblastomas of the ovary, adrenal-like tumors of the ovary, and luteomas. The relationship of these tumors to each other, especially as regards histogenesis, morphology, and endocrine function, is a matter of continuing discussion, but these relationships remain unsettled. Teilum1 has emphasized the need for an improved histogenetic and morphologic classification of these and other functioning ovarian neoplasms. Another ovarian lesion associated with virilization, namely, hyperplasia or tumor of ovarian hilus cells, has recently been studied by Sternberg2 and discussed by Schiller.3 The ovarian hilus cells have been called sympathicotropic cells, ovarian Leydig cells, ovarian interstitial cells, and extraglandular Leydig cells; they are morphologically indistinguishable from testicular interstitial cells of Leydig (which produce androgen in the male) and are considered to be a possible source of ovarian androgen.2 Cases of tumor of ovarian hilus cells have been reported References 1. Teilum, G.: Estrogen-Producing Sertoli Cell Tumors (Androblastoma Tubulare Lipoides) of the Human Testis and Ovary: Homologous Ovarian and Testicular Tumors, III. , J. Clin. Endocrinol. 9:301-318 ( (April) ) 1949.Crossref 2. Sternberg, W. H.: The Morphology, Androgenic Function, Hyperplasia, and Tumors of the Human Ovarian Hilus Cells , Am. J. Path. 25:493-521 ( (May) ) 1949. 3. Schiller, W.: Embryology and Development of the Female Reproductive Tract, in Progress in Gynecology , edited by J. V. Meigs and S. H. Sturgis, New York, Grune & Stratton, Inc., 1950, Vol. 2, p. 27. 4. Berger, L.: Tumeur des cellules sympathicotropes de l'ovaire avec virilisation , Rev. canad. biol. 1:539-566 ( (June) ) 1942. 5. Waugh, D.; Venning, E. H., and McEachern, D.: Sympathicotropic (Leydig) Cell Tumor of Ovary with Virilism: Report of a Case , J. Clin. Endocrinol. 9:486-496 ( (June) ) 1949.Crossref 6. Sachs, B. A., and Spiro, D.: Leydig (Sympathicotropic) Cell Tumor of Ovary: Report of a Case with Virilism, Including Postmortem Findings , J. Clin. Endocrinol. 11:878-889 ( (Aug) .) 1951.Crossref 7. Dr. Gordon R. Hennigar described the autopsy material. 8. Young, W. R.: Association of Masculinizing Tumor of the Ovary and Pregnancy , Illinois M. J. 100:263-265 ( (Oct.) ) 1951. 9. Sternberg, W. H.: Personal communication to the authors. 10. Sternberg.2 11. Berger.4 12. Waugh.5 13. Sternberg.2 14. Waugh.5 15. Sachs.6 16. These are urinary formaldehydogenic corticosteroids. In this laboratory the values for normal adults are 0.3 to 1.0 mg. per 24 hours. 17. Mason, H. L., and Engstrom, W. M.: The 17-Ketosteroids: Their Origin, Determination and Significance , Physiol. Rev. 30:321-374 ( (July) ) 1950.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1953

References