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Outcomes Data on Surgical Therapies for Silent Reflux

Outcomes Data on Surgical Therapies for Silent Reflux Surgical Treatment for Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Disease Review Clinical Review & Education Invited Commentary Rishi D. Naik, MD, MSCI; Michael F. Vaezi, MD, PhD, MSc(Epi) In a systematic review in this issue of JAMA Otolaryngology– showed that 83% to 93% of healthy controls had 1 or more signs 1 4 Head & Neck Surgery, Lechien et al report a systematic re- of laryngeal irritation on results of laryngoscopy. view of studies that examined the efficacy of surgical fundo- Inclusion criteria are limited largely by the lack of uni- plication for patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) formly accepted patient-related outcomes for all included stud- disease. In their extensive ies. Much of this noise is reverberated by the poor specificity analysis starting with 266 ar- of LPR symptoms, poor operative characteristics of diagnos- Related article page 655 ticles and ending with 34 tic tests, and lack of laryngeal signs having specificity for dis- studies meeting inclusion criteria, a total of 2190 patients were ease process nor being associated with treatment success. studied and the analysis showed that, after fundoplication, 83% The authors propose standardization of pH probes and of patients experienced partial relief of symptoms and 67% of mandatory impedance testing, but http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery American Medical Association

Outcomes Data on Surgical Therapies for Silent Reflux

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2019 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6181
eISSN
2168-619X
DOI
10.1001/jamaoto.2019.0340
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Surgical Treatment for Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Disease Review Clinical Review & Education Invited Commentary Rishi D. Naik, MD, MSCI; Michael F. Vaezi, MD, PhD, MSc(Epi) In a systematic review in this issue of JAMA Otolaryngology– showed that 83% to 93% of healthy controls had 1 or more signs 1 4 Head & Neck Surgery, Lechien et al report a systematic re- of laryngeal irritation on results of laryngoscopy. view of studies that examined the efficacy of surgical fundo- Inclusion criteria are limited largely by the lack of uni- plication for patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) formly accepted patient-related outcomes for all included stud- disease. In their extensive ies. Much of this noise is reverberated by the poor specificity analysis starting with 266 ar- of LPR symptoms, poor operative characteristics of diagnos- Related article page 655 ticles and ending with 34 tic tests, and lack of laryngeal signs having specificity for dis- studies meeting inclusion criteria, a total of 2190 patients were ease process nor being associated with treatment success. studied and the analysis showed that, after fundoplication, 83% The authors propose standardization of pH probes and of patients experienced partial relief of symptoms and 67% of mandatory impedance testing, but

Journal

JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 2, 2019

References